• A Farewell to Arms

    is the unforgettable story of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse. Set against the looming horrors of the battlefield – the weary, demoralized men marching in the rain during the German attack on Caporetto; the profound struggle between loyalty and desertion???this gripping, semiautobiographical work captures the harsh realities of war and the pain of lovers caught in its inexorable sweep. Ernest Hemingway famously said that he rewrote his ending to , thirty-nine times to get the words right.

  • A Moveable Feast

    Hemingway’s memories of his life as an unknown writer living in Paris in the twenties are deeply personal, warmly affectionate, and full of wit. Looking back not only at his own much younger self, but also at the other writers who shared Paris with him – James Joyce, Wyndham Lewis, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald – he recalls the time when, poor, happy, and writing in cafes, he discovered his vocation. Written during the last years of Hemingway’s life, his memoir is a lively and powerful reflection of his genius that scintillates with the romance of the city.

  • Ernest Hemingway on Writing

    An assemblage of reflections on the nature of writing and the writer from one the greatest American writers of the twentieth century.,Throughout Hemingway???s career as a writer, he maintained that it was bad luck to talk about writing???that it takes off ???whatever butterflies have on their wings and the arrangement of hawk???s feathers if you show it or talk about it.???,Despite this belief, by the end of his life he had done just what he intended not to do. In his novels and stories, in letters to editors, friends, fellow artists, and critics, in interviews and in commissioned articles on the subject, Hemingway wrote often about writing. And he wrote as well and as incisively about the subject as any writer who ever lived???,”This book contains Hemingway???s reflections on the nature of the writer and on elements of the writer???s life, including specific and helpful advice to writers on the craft of writing, work habits, and discipline. The Hemingway personality comes through in general wisdom, wit, humor, and insight, and in his insistence on the integrity of the writer and of the profession itself.” ???From the Preface by Larry W. Phillips

  • For Whom the Bell Tolls

    In 1937 Ernest Hemingway traveled to Spain to cover the civil war there for the North American Newspaper Alliance. Three years later he completed the greatest novel to emerge from “the good fight,” For Whom the Bell Tolls.,The story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to an antifascist guerilla unit in the mountains of Spain, it tells of loyalty and courage, love and defeat, and the tragic death of an ideal. In his portrayal of Jordan’s love for the beautiful Maria and his superb account of El Sordo’s last stand, in his brilliant travesty of La Pasionaria and his unwillingness to believe in blind faith, Hemingway surpasses his achievement in The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms to create a work at once rare and beautiful, strong and brutal, compassionate, moving, and wise. “If the function of a writer is to reveal reality,” Maxwell Perkins wrote Hemingway after reading the manuscript, “no one ever so completely performed it.” Greater in power, broader in scope, and more intensely emotional than any of the author’s previous works, it stands as one of the best war novels of all time.

  • Green Hills of Africa

    The most intimate and elaborately enhanced addition to the Hemingway Library series: Hemingway???s memoir of his safari across the Serengeti???presented with archival material from the Hemingway Collection at the John F. Kennedy Library, and with the never-before-published safari journal of Hemingway???s second wife, Pauline Pfeiffer.,First published in 1935, Green Hills of Africa is Ernest Hemingway???s lyrical account of his safari in the great game country of East Africa with his wife Pauline. Hemingway???s fascination with big-game hunting is magnificently captured in this evocative narrative of his trip. In examining the poetic grace of the chase, and the ferocity of the kill, Hemingway looks inward, seeking to explain the lure of the hunt and the primal undercurrent that comes alive on the plains of Africa. Green Hills of Africa is also an impassioned portrait of the glory of the African landscape, and of the beauty of a wilderness that was, even then, being threatened by the incursions of man. Hemingway???s rich description of the land and his passion for hunting combine to give Green Hills of Africa the immediacy of a deeply felt individual experience that is the hallmark of the greatest travel writing.,This new Hemingway Library Edition offers a fresh perspective on Hemingway???s classic travelogue with a personal foreword by Patrick Hemingway, the author???s sole surviving son, who, himself, spent many years as a professional hunter in East Africa; a new introduction by Se??n Hemingway, grandson of the author; and published for the first time in its entirety the African journal of Hemingway???s wife, Pauline Pfeiffer, which provides new insight into the experiences that shaped her husband???s craft.

  • The Old Man and the Sea

    This short novel, already a modern classic, is the superbly told, tragic story of a Cuban fisherman in the Gulf Stream and the giant Marlin he kills and loses ??? specifically referred to in the citation accompanying the author’s Nobel Prize for literature in 1954.