• A Short History of Nearly Everything

    In Bryson’s biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understand???and, if possible, answer???the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us. To that end, he has attached himself to a host of the world???s most advanced (and often obsessed) archaeologists, anthropologists, and mathematicians, travelling to their offices, laboratories, and field camps. He has read (or tried to read) their books, pestered them with questions, apprenticed himself to their powerful minds.,???,is the record of this quest, and it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it. Science has never been more involving or entertaining.

  • A Walk in the Woods

    The Appalachian Trail trail stretches from Georgia to Maine and covers some of the most breathtaking terrain in America???majestic mountains, silent forests, sparking lakes. If you???re going to take a hike, it???s probably the place to go. And Bill Bryson is surely the most entertaining guide you???ll find. He introduces us to the history and ecology of the trail and to some of the other hardy (or just foolhardy) folks he meets along the way???and a couple of bears. Already a classic, A Walk in the Woods will make you long for the great outdoors (or at least a comfortable chair to sit and read in).

  • At Home

    In these pages, the beloved Bill Bryson gives us a fascinating history of the modern home, taking us on a room-by-room tour through his own house and using each room to explore the vast history of the domestic artifacts we take for granted. As he takes us through the history of our modern comforts, Bryson demonstrates that whatever happens in the world eventually ends up in our home, in the paint, the pipes, the pillows, and every item of furniture. Bryson has one of the liveliest, most inquisitive minds on the planet, and his sheer prose fluency makes At Home one of the most entertaining books ever written about private life.

  • The Lost Continent

    ???The kind of book Steinbeck might have written if he???d traveled with David Letterman.??? ???New York magazine,An inspiring and hilarious account of one man???s rediscovery of America and his search for the perfect small town. ,Following an urge to rediscover his youth, Bill Bryson left his native Des Moines, Iowa, in a journey that would take him across 38 states. Lucky for us, he brought a notebook. With a razor wit and a kind heart, Bryson serves up a colorful tale of boredom, kitsch, and beauty when you least expect it. From Times Square to the Mississippi River to Williamsburg, Virginia, Bryson’s keen and hilarious search for the perfect American small town is a journey straight into the heart and soul of America.