• Adjaye Africa Architecture

    One of the world’s most exciting and accomplished architects, David Adjaye has built many highly-acclaimed houses and public buildings. This seven-volume edition documents Adjaye’s tribute to African metropolitan architecture.

  • An Eames Primer

    The first book to capture the philosophy and spirit behind the work of Charles and Ray Eames, “An Eames Primer” offers an in-depth look at the couple’s prolific legacy–one that has placed them among the most important American designers of the twentieth century. Those who know one or two aspects of the Eameses’ work are often surprised to learn just how far and vast their range extended. Yet throughout their myriad works, from architecture and furniture to exhibition and design and filmmaking, their core philosphy prevails. “An Eames Primer” is the first book to illuminate this seamless connection.,Author Eames Demetrios explores the rich energy of the Eameses’ world from a unique perspective, informed by his close relationship with Charles and Ray. He shares personal anecdotes, previously unpublished photos, and his extensive interviews with former friends and colleagues of the Eameses to make connections between the Eameses’ influential philosophy and their widely admired work. For those unacquainted with the designers, the stories behind the design process will inform, entertain, and inspire, while readers with an extensive knowledge of the Eameses’ work gain a deeper level of understanding their process.,Compact and highly accessible, “An Eames Primer” is the definitive introduction to the life of this century’s most influential designers.

  • Art & Place

    is an extraordinary collection of site???specific art in the Americas. Featuring hundreds of powerful art works in 60 cities ??? from Albuquerque to Boston and Baja to Rio de Janeiro ??? the book is both an informative guide and a virtual bucket list of outstanding art destinations.,Conceived and developed by Phaidon editors, , covers carving, painting, murals, frescos, earthworks, land art, and more. Each of the works has a dedicated entry pairing gorgeous, large-format images with in‐depth descriptions. Maps pinpoint the sites??? locations while specially commissioned plans reveal some of the more complex layouts. The book is organized geographically, offering fresh juxtapositions among familiar art works, such as Anish Kapoor???s , and Robert Smithson???s ,, alongside lesser-known revelations, such as Inhotim Centro de Arte Contempor??nea in Brazil. Whether in the mountains, at the heart of a city, or on a remote island, the works in , are all inextricably linked with their environment. This is art to experience in an immersive way, presented together in a single book for the first time.

  • California Design

    In 1951, designer Greta Magnusson Grossman observed that California design was “not a superimposed style, but an answer to present conditions…. It has developed out of our own preferences for living in a modern way.” California design influenced the material culture of the entire country, in everything from architecture to fashion. This generously illustrated book, which accompanies a major exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, is the first comprehensive examination of California’s mid-century modern design. It begins by tracing the origins of a distinctively California modernism in the 1930s by such European ??migr??s as Richard Neutra, Rudolph Schindler, and Kem Weber; it finds other specific design influences and innovations in solid-color commercial ceramics, inspirations from Mexico and Asia, new schools for design training, new concepts about leisure, and the conversion of wartime technologies to peacetime use (exemplified by Charles and Ray Eames’s plywood and fiberglass furniture).,The heart of California Design is the modern California home, famously characterized by open plans conducive to outdoor living. The layouts of modernist homes by Pierre Koenig, Craig Ellwood, and Raphael Soriano, for example, were intended to blur the distinction between indoors and out. Homes were furnished with products from Heath Ceramics, Van Keppel-Green, and Architectural Pottery as well as other, previously unheralded companies and designers. Many objects were designed to be multifunctional: pool and patio furniture that was equally suitable indoors, lighting that was both task and ambient, bookshelves that served as room dividers, and bathing suits that would turn into ensembles appropriate for indoor entertainment. California Design includes 350 images, most in color, of furniture, ceramics, metalwork, architecture, graphic and industrial design, film, textiles, and fashion, and ten incisive essays that trace the rise of the California design aesthetic.

  • Design As Art

    One of the last surviving members of the futurist generation, Bruno Munari’s ,is an illustrated journey into the artistic possibilities of modern design translated by Patrick Creagh published as part of the ‘Penguin on Design’ series in Penguin Modern Classics.,’The designer of today re-establishes the long-lost contact between art and the public, between living people and art as a living thing’,Bruno Munari was among the most inspirational designers of all time, described by Picasso as ‘the new Leonardo’. Munari insisted that design be beautiful, functional and accessible, and this enlightening and highly entertaining book sets out his ideas about visual, graphic and industrial design and the role it plays in the objects we use everyday. Lamps, road signs, typography, posters, children’s books, advertising, cars and chairs – these are just some of the subjects to which he turns his illuminating gaze.

  • How to See

    How to See was originally published in 1977. This reedition is updated and in color. More than a guide to visual appreciation, this is a book about how to recognize, evaluate, and understand the objects and landscape of the man-made world. The pursuit of design is not about the way things appear, but rather about the way things give meaning and relevance to the human experience.

  • John Severson’s Surf

    John Severson (born 1933) revolutionized pop culture’s vision of surfing and surf culture through his prolific artistic output that transverses decades and disciplines. He began his career as a painter, selling his canvases at Long Beach State College. These first works consisted of oil paintings, photographs, drawings and prints relating to Hawaiian and Californian surf culture. In 1958, Severson expanded his repertoire and created a series of popular surf movies, such as “Surf Safari,” “Surf Fever,” “Big Wednesday” and “Pacific Vibrations.”,While his were among the first surf movies, it was the posters associated with them, hugely popular when issued in the 1950s and 1960s, that remain collector favorites today. Showcased in these early posters, his graphic skills translated easily to “Surfer” magazine, which he founded in 1960. The magazine was the first to celebrate and revolutionize the art and sport of surfing, establishing it as a powerful pop culture phenomenon. The first issue was a 36-page collection of black-and-white photos, cartoon sketches and short articles–every aspect of which was created by Severson himself. His photographs appeared in “Life,” “Sports Illustrated,” “Paris Match” and other print venues.,”John Severson’s SURF” explores Severson’s surf odyssey through painting, photography, film and publishing. Featuring an interview with the artist by Nathan Howe, artist and curator at Puka Puka, Hawaii, foreword by Gerry Lopez, surfer and co-founder of Lightning Bolt surfboards and afterword by Drew Kampion, author and former editor of “Surfer,” “John Severson’s SURF” documents the birth of surf culture and serves as a testament to our ocean.

  • The Americans

    Introduction by Jack Kerouac. There is no question that Robert Frank’s The Americans is the most famous and influential photography book ever published. It was 1959 when the book first came out: a series of deceptively simple photographs that Frank took on a trip through America in ’55 and ’56, pictures of normal people, everyday scenes: lunch counters, bus depots, cars, and the stangely familiar faces of people we don’t quite know but have seen somewhere. They are pictures that saw the “American way of life” as we hadn’t yet quite been able to see it ourselves, photographs that condensed the entire life of a nation in classic images that still speak to us today, forty years and several generations later.