Thomas William Hiddleston is an English actor. He is the recipient of several accolades, including a Golden Globe Award and a Laurence Olivier Award, and has been nominated for two Primetime Emmy Awards.

  • Anna Karenina

    Acclaimed by many as the world’s greatest novel, , provides a vast panorama of contemporary life in Russia and of humanity in general. In it Tolstoy uses his intense imaginative insight to create some of the most memorable characters in all of literature. Anna is a sophisticated woman who abandons her empty existence as the wife of Karenin and turns to Count Vronsky to fulfil her passionate nature – with tragic consequences. Levin is a reflection of Tolstoy himself, often expressing the author’s own views and convictions.,Throughout, Tolstoy points no moral, merely inviting us not to judge but to watch. As Rosemary Edmonds comments, ‘He leaves the shifting patterns of the kaleidoscope to bring home the meaning of the brooding words following the title, ‘Vengeance is mine, and I will repay.

  • Any Human Heart

    Logan Gonzago Mountstuart, writer, was born in 1906, and died of a heart attack on October 5, 1991, aged 85. William Boyd’s novel Any Human Heart is his disjointed autobiography, a massive tome chronicling “my personal rollercoaster”–or rather, “not so much a rollercoaster”, but a yo-yo, “a jerking spinning toy in the hands of a maladroit child.” From his early childhood in Montevideo, son of an English corned beef executive and his Uraguayan secretary, through his years at a Norfolk public school and Oxford, Mountstuart traces his haphazard development as a writer. Early and easy success is succeeded by a long half-century of mediocrity, disappointments and setbacks, both personal and professional, leading him to multiple failed marriages, internment, alcoholism, and abject poverty.,Mountstuart’s sorry tale is also the story of a British way of life in inexorable decline, as his journey takes in the Bloomsbury set, the General Strike, the Spanish Civil War, 1930s Americans in Paris, wartime espionage, New York avant garde art, even the Baader-Meinhof gang–all with a stellar supporting cast. The most sustained and best moment comes mid-book, as Mountstuart gets caught up in one of Britain’s murkier wartime secrets, in the company of the here truly despicable Duke and Duchess of Windsor. Elsewhere Boyd occasionally misplaces his tongue too obviously in his cheek–the Wall Street Crash is trailed with truly crashing inelegance–but overall Any Human Heart is a witty, inventive and ultimately moving novel. Boyd succeeds in conjuring not only a compelling 20th century but also, in the hapless Logan Mountstuart, an anti-hero who achieves something approaching passive greatness.

  • Armadillo

    One cold winter’s morning, Lorimer Black — insurance adjuster, young, good-looking, on the rise — goes out on a perfectly ordinary business appointment, finds a hanged man and realizes that his life is about to be turned upside down. The elements at play: a beautiful actress glimpsed in a passing taxi . . . an odd new business associate whose hiring, firing and rehiring make little sense . . . a rock musician who is losing his mind — and a web of fraud in which virtually everyone Lorimer Black knows has been caught and in which he finds himself increasingly entangled.

  • At Last

    As friends, relatives and foes trickle in to pay their final respects to his mother Eleanor, Patrick Melrose finds himself questioning whether a life without parents will be the liberation he has so long imagined. Yet as the memorial service ends and the family gathers one last time, amidst the social niceties and the social horrors, the calms and the rapids, Patrick begins to sense a new current: the chance of some form of safety ??? at last.

  • Bad News

    Twenty-two years old and in the grip of a massive addiction, Patrick Melrose is forced to fly to New York to collect his father???s ashes. Over the course of a weekend, Patrick???s remorseless search for drugs on the avenues of Manhattan, haunted by old acquaintances and insistent inner voices, sends him into a nightmarish spiral. Alone in his room at the Pierre Hotel, he pushes body and mind to the very edge ??? desperate always to stay one step ahead of his rapidly encroaching past.,Bad News was originally published, along with Never Mind and Some Hope, as part of a three book omnibus also called Some Hope.

  • Cabinet of Curiosities

    With his movies – from blockbusters like Hellboy to the Oscar-winning Pan???s Labyrinth – comics, and novels, del Toro has proven himself to be a unique visionary. His creative crucible can be seen in his illustrated notebooks. Here these records of his creative process form the basis for a stunning illustrated book and insightful examination of the themes that haunt, electrify, and enrich his work.

  • Cranford

    ???,A portrait of the residents of an English country town in the mid nineteenth century, , relates the adventures of Miss Matty and Miss Deborah, two middle-aged spinster sisters striving to live with dignity in reduced circumstances. Through a series of vignettes, Elizabeth Gaskell portrays a community governed by old-fashioned habits and dominated by friendships between women. Her wry account of rural life is undercut, however, by tragedy in its depiction of such troubling events as Matty’s bankruptcy, the violent death of Captain Brown or the unwitting cruelty of Peter Jenkyns. Written with acute observation, , is by turns affectionate, moving and darkly satirical.,In her introduction, Patricia Ingham discusses , in relation to Gaskell’s own past and as a work of irony in the manner of Jane Austen. She also considers the implications of the novel in terms of class and empire. This edition also includes further reading, notes, and an appendix on the significance of ‘Fashion at Cranford’.

  • Dracula

    During a business visit to Count Dracula’s castle in Transylvania, a young English solicitor finds himself at the center of a series of horrifying incidents. Jonathan Harker is attacked by three phantom women, observes the Count’s transformation from human to bat form, and discovers puncture wounds on his own neck that seem to have been made by teeth. Harker returns home upon his escape from Dracula’s grim fortress, but a friend’s strange malady ??? involving sleepwalking, inexplicable blood loss, and mysterious throat wounds ??? initiates a frantic vampire hunt. The popularity of Bram Stoker’s 1897 horror romance is as deathless as any vampire. Its supernatural appeal has spawned a host of film and stage adaptations, and more than a century after its initial publication, it continues to hold readers spellbound.

  • Galapagos

    Rocky, fragile, beautiful, strange???the Gal??pagos archipelago is unlike any other place on earth. Its geology, its unique flora and fauna, and its striking role in human history intersect in surprising and dynamic ways. This book is the most wide-ranging and beautifully illustrated book available on the famous islands. Not since Darwin???s ,has a book combined so much scientific and historic information with firsthand accounts that bring the Gal??pagos to life., describes how tragedy and murderous pirates curtailed settlement of the islands and how the islands??? pristine nature, spectacular geology, and defining isolation inspired Darwin???s ideas about evolution. The book explores the diverse land and marine habitats that shelter Gal??pagos species and considers the islands??? importance today as a frontier for science and a refuge for true wilderness.,The book???s extensive gazetteer provides details about endemic plants and animals as well as travel advice about visitors??? sites, diving, photography, when to go, and what to take. Vividly illustrated throughout, this guide is an indispensable reference for natural history enthusiasts, armchair travelers, and island visitors alike.

  • Go the F**k to Sleep

    A laugh-out-loud, adults-only bedtime story for parents familiar with the age-old struggle of putting their kids to bed, is a book for parents who live in the real world, where a few snoozing kitties and cutesy rhymes don???t always send a toddler sailing blissfully off to dreamland. Profane, affectionate, and radically honest, it captures the familiar???and unspoken???tribulations of putting your little angel down for the night.,Read by a host of celebrities, from Samuel L. Jackson to Jennifer Garner, this subversively funny bestselling storybook will not actually put your kids to sleep, but it will leave you laughing so hard you won???t care.

  • Harry Potter

    Now for the first time ever, J.K. Rowling???s seven bestselling Harry Potter books are available in a stunning paperback boxed set! The Harry Potter series has been hailed as ???one for the ages??? by Stephen King and ???a spellbinding saga??? by USA Today. And most recently, , called , the ???fastest selling book in history.???

  • High-Rise

    When a class war erupts inside a luxurious apartment block, modern elevators become violent battlegrounds and cocktail parties degenerate into marauding attacks on “enemy” floors. In this visionary tale, human society slips into violent reverse as once-peaceful residents, driven by primal urges, re-create a world ruled by the laws of the jungle.

  • His Father???s Son

    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

  • Juicy and Delicious

    The Play That Inspired the Movie Beasts of the Southern Wild.,Juicy and Delicious is an epic chronicle of one boy’s journey to self-discovery. Hushpuppy is a motherless child in the rural South who lives with his Daddy. But when Daddy gets sick, the universe starts to fall apart. Ancient beasts rerun from their graves, things fall from the sky, and ghosts live among the living. Hushpuppy is faced with being an orphan, and the end of the known world. Daddy and the brilliant, wild teacher, Miss Bathsheba, work to prepare Hushpuppy and his schoolmates for a life without grownups, a world where they must take care of each other. Tender, funny, and heartbreaking, Juicy and Delicious weaves a beautiful tale of loss, survival, and self-discovery.

  • Letters

    Jane Austen’s letters afford a unique insight into the daily life of the novelist: intimate and gossipy, observant and informative–they read much like the novels themselves. They bring alive her family and friends, her surroundings and contemporary events with a freshness unparalleled in modern biographies. Above all we recognize the unmistakable voice of the author of such novels as Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility. We see the shift in her writing from witty and amusing descriptions of the social life of town and country, to a thoughtful and constructive tone while writing about the business of literary composition.

  • Life of Pi

    Life of Pi is a fantasy adventure novel by Yann Martel published in 2001. The protagonist, Piscine Molitor “Pi” Patel, a Tamil boy from Pondicherry, explores issues of spirituality and practicality from an early age. He survives 227 days after a shipwreck while stranded on a boat in the Pacific Ocean with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.

  • Life???s that Way

    A special book about the end of one life and the beginning of another., is a modern-day Book of Job. In August 2003, Jim Beaver, a character actor whom many know from the popular HBO series Deadwood, and his wife Cecily learned what they thought was the worst news possible- their daughter Maddie was autistic. Then six weeks later the roof fell in-Cecily was diagnosed with stage-four lung cancer.,Jim immediately began writing a nightly e-mail as a way to keep more than one hundred family and friends up to date about Cecily’s condition. Soon four thousand people a day, from all around the world, were receiving them. Initially a cathartic exercise for Jim, the prose turned into an unforgettable journey for his readers.,Cecily died four months after being diagnosed, but Jim continued the e-mails for a year after her diagnosis, revealing how he and Maddie coped with Cecily’s death and how they managed to move forward. , is a compilation of those nightly e-mails. Jim’s experience is universal for anybody who has lost a loved one. But , is not solely about loss. It is an immediate, day-by-day account of living through a nightmare but also of discovering the joy of a child, of being on the receiving end of unthinkable kindness, and of learning to navigate life anew. As Jim says, these are hard-won blessings. But then again, life’s that way.

  • Mother???s Milk

    Writing with the scathing wit and bright perceptiveness for which he has become known, celebrated English author Edward St. Aubyn creates a complex family portrait that examines the shifting allegiances between mothers, sons, and husbands. The novel???s perspective ricochets among all members of the Melrose family — the family featured in St. Aubyn???s widely praised trilogy, , — starting with Robert, who provides an exceptionally droll and convincing account of being born; to Patrick, a hilariously churlish husband who has been sexually abandoned by his wife in favor of his sons; to Mary, who???s consumed by her children and overwhelming desire not to repeat the mistakes of her own mother.,All the while, St. Aubyn examines the web of false promises that entangle this once illustrious family — whose last vestige of wealth, an old house in the south of France — is about to be donated by Patrick???s mother to a New Age foundation. An up-to-the-minute dissection of the mores of child-rearing, marriage, adultery, and assisted suicide, , showcases St. Aubyn???s luminous and acidic prose — and his masterful ability to combine the most excruciating emotional pain with the driest comedy.

  • Mr. Harrison???s Confessions

    This charming and witty prequel to , is a neglected Gaskell classic with all the period detail, distinctively drawn characters, and a well-knitted plot associated with her works.,Enjoying the comforts of his well-kept home, country doctor William Harrison is prevailed upon by his longtime friend Charles, a bachelor, to dispense some advice on the “wooing and winning” of women???s affections. So begins the fascinating and varied recollections of one of Gaskell’s best-loved characters. Lured to rural Duncombe by the promise of a partnership in a country practice, William finds himself trapped in claustrophobic provincial life where society is apparently presided over by the scheming of a set of under-occupied middle-aged women. Their supposed matchmaking prowess in fact leaves much to be desired; so much so, indeed, that before long the hapless young physician finds himself betrothed to three women???none of whom is the beautiful Sophy, the woman he truly desires. Chaotic, hilarious, and poignant, this comedy of manners???and of errors???will resonate with Gaskell aficionados and newcomers alike.

  • My Lady Ludlow

    Lady Ludlow is absolute mistress of Hanbury Court and a resolute opponent of anything that might disturb the class system into which she was born. She will keep no servant who can read and write and insists that the lower orders have no rights, but only duties. But the winds of change are blowing through the village of Hanbury. The vicar, Mr. Gray, wishes to start a Sunday school for religious reasons; Mr. Horner wants to educate the citizens for economic reasons. But Lady Ludlow is not as rigid as one may think.