Scott Pape is an author and radio commentator who lives in Melbourne, Australia. He is best known through his online persona, the Barefoot Investor, which is also the name of his hugely popular personal finance book and a business show he hosts.

  • 100 Minds That Made the Market

    Introducing the new Fisher Investment Series, comprised of engaging and informative titles written by renowned money manager and bestselling author Ken Fisher. This series offers essential insights into the worlds of investing and finance.,Over the course of nearly two centuries, the innovations, mistakes, and scandals of different market participants have played an important role in shaping today’s financial markets. Now, in ,, Ken Fisher delivers cameo biographies of these pioneers of American financial history. From Joe Kennedy’s “sexcapades” to Jesse Livermore’s suicide, this book details the drama, the dirt, and the financial principles of an amazingly inventive group of financial minds. Fisher digs deep to uncover the careers, personal lives, and contributions of these individuals, and leads you through the lessons that can be learned from each one. Here you have 100 of the best teachers — some you already know, some you will feel you know, and some you may not have previously discovered — whose experiences will undoubtedly enhance your understanding of the markets.,With a few pages dedicated to each person, , quickly captures the essence of the people and ideas that have influenced the evolution of the financial industry.

  • Affluenza

    Anyone concerned about the level of their personal debt or frustrated by the rat race of aspiring to an affluent lifestyle will appreciate this critique of the effects of over-consumption. This analysis pulls no punches as it describes both the problem and what can be done to stop it. Analyzing the increasing rates of stress, depression, and obesity as possible effects of the consumption binge currently gripping the Western world, this report tracks how Australians overwork, the growing number of things thrown out, self-medicated drugs, and the real meaning of the word choice.

  • Banker to the Poor

    Muhammad Yunus is that rare thing: a bona fide visionary. His dream is the total eradication of poverty from the world. In 1983, against the advice of banking and government officials, Yunus established Grameen, a bank devoted to providing the poorest of Bangladesh with minuscule loans. Grameen Bank, based on the belief that credit is a basic human right, not the privilege of a fortunate few, now provides over 2.5 billion dollars of micro-loans to more than two million families in rural Bangladesh. Ninety-four percent of Yunus’s clients are women, and repayment rates are near 100 percent. Around the world, micro-lending programs inspired by Grameen are blossoming, with more than three hundred programs established in the United States alone., is Muhammad Yunus’s memoir of how he decided to change his life in order to help the world’s poor. In it he traces the intellectual and spiritual journey that led him to fundamentally rethink the economic relationship between rich and poor, and the challenges he and his colleagues faced in founding Grameen. He also provides wise, hopeful guidance for anyone who would like to join him in “putting homelessness and destitution in a museum so that one day our children will visit it and ask how we could have allowed such a terrible thing to go on for so long.” The definitive history of micro-credit direct from the man that conceived of it, Banker to the Poor is necessary and inspirational reading for anyone interested in economics, public policy, philanthropy, social history, and business.,Muhammad Yunus was born in Bangladesh and earned his Ph.D. in economics in the United States at Vanderbilt University, where he was deeply influenced by the civil rights movement. He still lives in Bangladesh, and travels widely around the world on behalf of Grameen Bank and the concept of micro-credit.

  • Boomerang

    The tsunami of cheap credit that rolled across the planet between 2002 and 2008 was more than a simple financial phenomenon: it was temptation, offering entire societies the chance to reveal aspects of their characters they could not normally afford to indulge.,Icelanders wanted to stop fishing and become investment bankers. The Greeks wanted to turn their country into a pinata stuffed with cash and allow as many citizens as possible to take a whack at it. The Germans wanted to be even more German; the Irish wanted to stop being Irish.,Michael Lewis’s investigation of bubbles beyond our shores is so brilliantly, sadly hilarious that it leads the American reader to a comfortable complacency: oh, those foolish foreigners. But when he turns a merciless eye on California and Washington, DC, we see that the narrative is a trap baited with humor, and we understand the reckoning that awaits the greatest and greediest of debtor nations.

  • Bounce

    In the vein of the international bestselling ,, award-winning journalist Matthew Syed reveals the hidden clues to success???in sports, business, school, and just about anything else that you???d want to be great at. Fans of , and Malcolm Gladwell???s , will find many interesting and helpful insights in Bounce.

  • Branson

    No tycoon is more popular, few claim to be richer, and none has masterminded a more recognizable brand than Richard Branson. What is behind the success of the buccaneering balloonist, the tabloids??? favorite celebrity nude, the “grinning jumper,” and the scourge of corporate goliaths? Helped by eyewitness accounts of more than 250 people with direct experience with Branson, Tom Bower has uncovered a different tale than the one so eagerly promoted by Virgin???s publicists. Here is the full story of Branson???his businesses, his friendships, his ambition, his law-breaking, his drug-taking, his bullying.,From the cockpit of a balloon in the clouds to the center of Branson???s operations in his Holland Park home, this book is an intimate scrutiny of exactly how Richard Branson created himself and sold himself. Tom Bower???s biography reveals Branson to be a single-minded profiteer who, while occasionally generous to others, has a fixed purpose to enhance his family???s wealth in secret off-shore trust funds. Instead of a glittering saint, Branson emerges as a devious actor, proud of swiping for his own profit the good ideas of others. From his quest to acquire the license for the National Lottery to his plans to launch space tourism with Virgin Galactic, this fully updated edition follows Branson???s enterprises and investments up to his failed bid for Northern Rock.

  • Factfulness

    Factfulness: The stress-reducing habit of only carrying opinions for which you have strong supporting facts.,When asked simple questions about global trends – why the world’s population is increasing; how many young women go to school; how many of us live in poverty – we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers.,In ,, Professor of International Health and a man who can make data sing, Hans Rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators Anna and Ola, offers a radical new explanation of why this happens, and reveals the ten instincts that distort our perspective.,It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most.,Inspiring and revelatory, filled with lively anecdotes and moving stories, , is an urgent and essential book that will change the way you see the world.

  • Free to Choose

    The international bestseller on the extent to which personal freedom has been eroded by government regulations and agencies while personal prosperity has been undermined by government spending and economic controls.

  • Future Babble

    In 2008, as the price of oil surged above $140 a barrel, experts said it would soon hit $200; a few months later it plunged to $30. In 1967, they said the USSR would have one of the fastest-growing economies in the year 2000; in 2000, the USSR did not exist. In 1911, it was pronounced that there would be no more wars in Europe; we all know how that turned out. Face it, experts are about as accurate as dart-throwing monkeys. And yet every day we ask them to predict the future ??? everything from the weather to the likelihood of a catastrophic terrorist attack., is the first book to examine this phenomenon, showing why our brains yearn for certainty about the future, why we are attracted to those who predict it confidently, and why it???s so easy for us to ignore the trail of outrageously wrong forecasts.,In this fast-paced, example-packed, sometimes darkly hilarious book, journalist Dan Gardner shows how seminal research by UC Berkeley professor Philip Tetlock proved that pundits who are more famous are less accurate ??? and the average expert is no more accurate than a flipped coin. Gardner also draws on current research in cognitive psychology, political science, and behavioral economics to discover something quite reassuring: The future is always uncertain, but the end is not always near.

  • Grow Rich! With Peace of Mind

    In this exciting book, the renowned author of THINK AND GROW RICH, Napoleon Hill, reveals his latest discoveries about getting what you want–and making the most of it. Here, in simple, readable language, are the foolproof techniques for achieving the power to earn money and to enjoy genuine inner peace. You wil learn: how to succeed in life, succeed in being yourself; how to develop your own healthy ego; how to win the job you want–and keep going upward; how to turn every challenge into a new success, and more.

  • How to Break Up With Your Phone

    Packed with tested strategies and practical tips, this book is the essential, life-changing guide for everyone who owns a smartphone.,Is your phone the first thing you reach for in the morning and the last thing you touch before bed? Do you frequently pick it up “just to check,” only to look up forty-five minutes later wondering where the time has gone? Do you say you want to spend less time on your phone–but have no idea how to do so without giving it up completely? If so, this book is your solution.,Award-winning journalist Catherine Price presents a practical, hands-on plan to break up–and then make up–with your phone. The goal? A long-term relationship that actually feels ,???,You’ll discover how phones and apps are designed to be addictive, and learn how the time we spend on them damages our abilities to focus, think deeply, and form new memories. You’ll then make customized changes to your settings, apps, environment, and mindset that will ultimately enable you to take back control of your life.

  • How to Get Rich

    ‘Making money is a knack, a knack that can be acquired. And if someone like me can become rich, then so can you – no matter what your present circumstances. Here is how I did it and what I learned along the way.’ So writes Felix Dennis, who believes that almost anyone of reasonable intelligence can become rich, given sufficient motivation and application., is a distillation of his business wisdom. Primarily concerned with the step-by-step creation of wealth, it ruthlessly dissects the business failures and financial triumphs of ‘a South London lad who became rich virtually by accident’. Part manual, part memoir, part primer, this book is a template for those who are willing to stare down failure and transform their lives.,Canny, infuriating, cynical and generous by turns, , is an invaluable guide to ‘the surprisingly simple art of collecting money which already has your name on it’.

  • How to Lie with Statistics

    Darrell Huff runs the gamut of every popularly used type of statistic, probes such things as the sample study, the tabulation method, the interview technique, or the way the results are derived from the figures, and points up the countless number of dodges which are used to full rather than to inform.

  • Influence

    The widely adopted, now classic book on influence and persuasion???a major national and international bestseller with more than four million copies sold!,In this highly acclaimed New York Times bestseller, Dr. Robert B. Cialdini???the seminal expert in the field of influence and persuasion???explains the psychology of why people say yes and how to apply these principles ethically in business and everyday situations.,You???ll learn the six universal principles of influence and how to use them to become a skilled persuader???and, just as importantly, how to defend yourself against dishonest influence attempts.

  • Irrational Exuberance

    As Robert Shiller???s new 2009 preface to his prescient classic on behavioral economics and market volatility asserts, the irrational exuberance of the stock and housing markets ???has been ended by an economic crisis of a magnitude not seen since the Great Depression of the 1930s.??? As we all, ordinary Americans and professional investors alike, crawl from the wreckage of our heedless bubble economy, the shrewd insights and sober warnings, and hard facts that Shiller marshals in this book are more invaluable than ever.,The original and bestselling 2000 edition of Irrational Exuberance evoked Alan Greenspan???s infamous 1996 use of that phrase to explain the alternately soaring and declining stock market. It predicted the collapse of the tech stock bubble through an analysis of the structural, cultural, and psychological factors behind levels of price growth not reflected in any other sector of the economy. In the second edition (2005), Shiller folded real estate into his analysis of market volatility, marshalling evidence that housing prices were dangerously inflated as well, a bubble that could soon burst, leading to a ???string of bankruptcies??? and a ???worldwide recession.??? That indeed came to pass, with consequences that the 2009 preface to this edition deals with.,Irrational Exuberance is more than ever a cogent, chilling, and astonishingly far-seeing analytical work that no one with any money in any market anywhere can afford not to read???and heed.

  • Losing My Virginity

    “Oh, screw it, let’s do it.”,That’s the philosophy that has allowed Richard Branson, in slightly more than twenty-five years, to spawn so many successful ventures. From the airline business (Virgin Atlantic Airways), to music (Virgin Records and V2), to cola (Virgin Cola), to retail (Virgin Megastores), and nearly a hundred others, ranging from financial services to bridal wear, Branson has a track record second to none.,Losing My Virginity is the unusual, frequently outrageous autobiography of one of the great business geniuses of our time. When Richard Branson started his first business, he and his friends decided that “since we’re complete virgins at business, let’s call it just that: Virgin.” Since then, Branson has written his own “rules” for success, creating a group of companies with a global presence, but no central headquarters, no management hierarchy, and minimal bureaucracy.,Many of Richard Branson’s companies–airlines, retailing, and cola are good examples–were started in the face of entrenched competition. The experts said, “Don’t do it.” But Branson found golden opportunities in markets in which customers have been ripped off or underserved, where confusion reigns, and the competition is complacent.

  • Never Eat Alone

    The bestselling business classic on the power of relationships, updated with in-depth ??advice for making connections in the digital world.,Do you want to get ahead in life? Climb the ladder to personal success?,The secret, master networker Keith Ferrazzi claims, is in reaching out to other people. As Ferrazzi discovered in early life, what distinguishes highly successful people from everyone else is the way they use the power of relationships???so that everyone wins.,In Never Eat Alone, Ferrazzi lays out the specific steps???and inner mindset???he uses to reach out to connect with the thousands of colleagues, friends, and associates on his contacts list, people he has helped and who have helped him. And in the time since Never Eat Alone was published in 2005, the rise of social media and new, collaborative management styles have only made Ferrazzi???s advice more essential for anyone hoping to get ahead in business.,The son of a small-town steelworker and a cleaning lady, Ferrazzi first used his remarkable ability to connect with others to pave the way to Yale, a Harvard M.B.A., and several top executive posts. Not yet out of his thirties, he developed a network of relationships that stretched from Washington???s corridors of power to Hollywood???s A-list, leading to him being named one of Crain???s 40 Under 40 and selected as a Global Leader for Tomorrow by the Davos World Economic Forum.,In the course of this book, Ferrazzi outlines the timeless strategies shared by the world???s most connected individuals, from Winston Churchill to Bill Clinton, Vernon Jordan to the Dalai Lama.,Chock-full of specific advice on handling rejection, getting past gatekeepers, becoming a ???conference commando,??? and more, this new edition of Never Eat Alone will remain a classic alongside alongside How to Win Friends and Influence People for years to come.

  • Only Yesterday

    From Frederick Lewis Allen, former editor-in-chief of , magazine, comes a classic history of 1920s America, from the end of World War I to the stock market crash and the beginning of The Great Depression. Originally published in 1931, , has an exuberance and proximity to its subject???the Roaring Twenties in all its scandal and glory???that uniquely captures the feel of the era.

  • Poor Charlie’s Almanack

    Poor Charlie’s Almanack is a collection of speeches and talks by Charlie Munger, compiled by Peter D. Kaufman.,Charlie Munger is the long serving vice-chairman of Berkshire Hathaway. This book brings together his investing thoughts beyond his famous statement “I have nothing to add.” Munger is an admirer of Benjamin Franklin, and the book’s title is a tribute to Franklin’s Poor Richard’s Almanack.,Net proceeds from sales of the book go to the Munger Research Center at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California.

  • QBQ!

    The lack of personal accountability is a problem that has resulted in an epidemic of blame, victim thinking, complaining, and procrastination. No organization???or individual???can successfully compete in the marketplace, achieve goals and objectives, provide outstanding service, engage in exceptional teamwork, or develop people without personal accountability.,John G. Miller believes that the troubles that plague organizations cannot be solved by pointing fingers and blaming others. Rather, the real solutions are found when each of us recognizes the power of personal accountability. In ,??, Miller explains how negative, ill-focused questions like ???Why do we have to go through all this change???? and ???Who dropped the ball???? represent a lack of personal accountability. Conversely, when we ask better questions???QBQs???such as ???What can I do to contribute???? or ???How can I help solve the problem???? our lives and our organizations are transformed.,This remarkable and timely book provides a practical method for putting personal accountability into daily actions, with astonishing results: problems are solved, internal barriers come down, service improves, teams thrive, and people adapt to change more quickly. , is an invaluable resource for anyone seeking to learn, grow, and change. Using this tool, each of us can add tremendous worth to our organizations and to our lives by eliminating blame, victim-thinking, and procrastination., was written more than a decade ago and has helped countless readers practice personal accountability at work and at home. This version features a new foreword, revisions and new material throughout, and a section of ??FAQs that the author has received over the years.