Reed Hastings is an American entrepreneur. He is the co-founder, Chairman and CEO of Netflix and serves on a number of boards and non-profit organizations. A former member of the California State Board of Education, Hastings is an advocate for education reform through charter schools.

  • Beyond Entrepreneurship

    This inspiring work provides entrepreneurs with building blocks to help their companies sustain high performance, play a leadership role in their industries, and remain great for generations. Includes plenty of real-world examples drawn from Nike, L.L. Bean, Wal-Mart, Federal Express, and other success stories.

  • Powerful

    Named by The Washington Post as one of the 11 Leadership Books to Read in 2018.,When it comes to recruiting, motivating, and creating great teams, Patty McCord says most companies have it all wrong. McCord helped create the unique and high-performing culture at Netflix, where she was chief talent officer. In her new book, Powerful: Building a Culture of Freedom and Responsibility, she shares what she learned there and elsewhere in Silicon Valley.,McCord advocates practicing radical honesty in the workplace, saying good-bye to employees who don???t fit the company???s emerging needs, and motivating with challenging work, not promises, perks, and bonus plans. McCord argues that the old standbys of corporate HR???annual performance reviews, retention plans, employee empowerment and engagement programs???often end up being a colossal waste of time and resources. Her road-tested advice, offered with humor and irreverence, provides readers a different path for creating a culture of high performance and profitability.,Powerful will change how you think about work and the way a business should be run.

  • Principles

    1 New York Times Bestseller.,???Significant…The book is both instructive and surprisingly moving.??? ???The New York Times,Ray Dalio, one of the world???s most successful investors and entrepreneurs, shares the unconventional principles that he???s developed, refined, and used over the past forty years to create unique results in both life and business???and which any person or organization can adopt to help achieve their goals.,In Principles, Dalio shares what he???s learned over the course of his remarkable career. He argues that life, management, economics, and investing can all be systemized into rules and understood like machines. The book???s hundreds of practical lessons, which are built around his cornerstones of ???radical truth??? and ???radical transparency,??? include Dalio laying out the most effective ways for individuals and organizations to make decisions, approach challenges, and build strong teams. He also describes the innovative tools the firm uses to bring an idea meritocracy to life, such as creating ???baseball cards??? for all employees that distill their strengths and weaknesses, and employing computerized decision-making systems to make believability-weighted decisions. While the book brims with novel ideas for organizations and institutions, Principles also offers a clear, straightforward approach to decision-making that Dalio believes anyone can apply, no matter what they???re seeking to achieve.,Here, from a man who has been called both ???the Steve Jobs of investing??? and ???the philosopher king of the financial universe??? (CIO magazine), is a rare opportunity to gain proven advice unlike anything you???ll find in the conventional business press.

  • That Will Never Work

    In the tradition of Phil Knight’s , comes the incredible untold story of how Netflix went from concept to company-all revealed by co-founder and first CEO Marc Randolph.,Once upon a time, brick-and-mortar video stores were king. Late fees were ubiquitous, video-streaming unheard was of, and widespread DVD adoption seemed about as imminent as flying cars. Indeed, these were the widely accepted laws of the land in 1997, when Marc Randolph had an idea. It was a simple thought-leveraging the internet to rent movies-and was just one of many more and far worse proposals, like personalized baseball bats and a shampoo delivery service, that Randolph would pitch to his business partner, Reed Hastings, on their commute to work each morning.,But Hastings was intrigued, and the pair-with Hastings as the primary investor and Randolph as the CEO-founded a company. Now with over 150 million subscribers, Netflix’s triumph feels inevitable, but the twenty first century’s most disruptive start up began with few believers and calamity at every turn. From having to pitch his own mother on being an early investor, to the motel conference room that served as a first office, to server crashes on launch day, to the now-infamous meeting when Netflix brass pitched Blockbuster to acquire them, Marc Randolph’s transformational journey exemplifies how anyone with grit, gut instincts and determination can change the world-even with an idea that many think will never work.,What emerges,though, isn’t just the inside story of one of the world’s most iconic companies. Full of counter-intuitive concepts and written in binge-worthy prose, it answers some of our most fundamental questions about taking that leap of faith in business or in life: How do you begin? How do you weather disappointment and failure? How do you deal with success? What even , success?,From idea generation to team building to knowing when it’s time to let go, , is not only the ultimate follow-your-dreams parable, but also one of the most dramatic and insightful entrepreneurial stories of our time.

  • The Long Tail

    The , bestseller that introduced the business world to a future that’s already here — now in paperback with a new chapter about Long Tail Marketing and a new epilogue.,Winner of the Gerald Loeb Award for Best Business Book of the Year.,In the most important business book since , Chris Anderson shows how the future of commerce and culture isn’t in hits, the high-volume head of a traditional demand curve, but in what used to be regarded as misses — the endlessly long tail of that same curve.

  • Tools and Weapons

    From Microsoft’s president and one of the tech industry’s broadest thinkers, a frank and thoughtful reckoning with how to balance enormous promise and existential risk as the digitization of everything accelerates.,???A colorful and insightful insiders??? view of how technology is both empowering and threatening us. From privacy to cyberattacks, this timely book is a useful guide for how to navigate the digital future.??? ???Walter Isaacson,Microsoft President Brad Smith operates by a simple core belief: When your technology changes the world, you bear a responsibility to help address the world you have helped create. This might seem uncontroversial, but it flies in the face of a tech sector long obsessed with rapid growth and sometimes on disruption as an end in itself. While sweeping digital transformation holds great promise, we have reached an inflection point. The world has turned information technology into both a powerful tool and a formidable weapon, and new approaches are needed to manage an era defined by even more powerful inventions like artificial intelligence. Companies that create technology must accept greater responsibility for the future, and governments will need to regulate technology by moving faster and catching up with the pace of innovation.,In ,, Brad Smith and Carol Ann Browne bring us a captivating narrative from the cockpit of one of the world’s largest and most powerful tech companies as it finds itself in the middle of some of the thorniest emerging issues of our time. These are challenges that come with no preexisting playbook, including privacy, cybercrime and cyberwar, social media, the moral conundrums of artificial intelligence, big tech’s relationship to inequality, and the challenges for democracy, far and near. While in no way a self-glorifying “Microsoft memoir,” the book pulls back the curtain remarkably wide onto some of the company’s most crucial recent decision points as it strives to protect the hopes technology offers against the very real threats it also presents. There are huge ramifications for communities and countries, and Brad Smith provides a thoughtful and urgent contribution to that effort.