Nassim Nicholas Taleb is a Lebanese-American essayist, scholar, statistician, and former option trader and risk analyst, whose work concerns problems of randomness, probability, and uncertainty.

  • 1,000 Foods To Eat Before You Die

    The ultimate gift for the food lover. In the same way that , reinvented the travel book, , is a joyous, informative, dazzling, mouthwatering life list of the world???s best food. The long-awaited new book in the phenomenal 1,000 . . . Before You Die series, it???s the marriage of an irresistible subject with the perfect writer, Mimi Sheraton???award-winning cookbook author, grande dame of food journalism, and former restaurant critic for ,., fully delivers on the promise of its title, selecting from the best cuisines around the world (French, Italian, Chinese, of course, but also Senegalese, Lebanese, Mongolian, Peruvian, and many more)???the tastes, ingredients, dishes, and restaurants that every reader should experience and dream about, whether it???s dinner at Chicago???s Alinea or the perfect empanada. In more than 1,000 pages and over 550 full-color photographs, it celebrates haute and snack, comforting and exotic, hyper-local and the universally enjoyed: a Tuscan plate of Fritto Misto. Saffron Buns for breakfast in downtown Stockholm. Bird???s Nest Soup. A frozen Milky Way. Black truffles from Le P??rigord.,Mimi Sheraton is highly opinionated, and has a gift for supporting her recommendations with smart, sensuous descriptions???you can almost taste what she???s tasted. You???ll want to eat your way through the book (after searching first for what you have already tried, and comparing notes). Then, following the romance, the practical: where to taste the dish or find the ingredient, and where to go for the best recipes, websites included.

  • A Few Lessons from Sherlock Holmes

    A Few Lessons from Sherlock Holmes is a book for those who want to improve their thinking. It is a practical and enjoyable book that tells in a short-easy-to-read way about what we all can learn from Sherlock Holmes. Peter Bevelin has distilled Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes into bite-sized principles and key quotes. This book will appeal to both Sherlock fans as well as those who want to think better. It contains useful and timeless methods and questions applicable to a variety of important issues in life and business. We could all benefit from ‘A few lessons from Sherlock Holmes’.

  • A Guide to Econometrics

    A text for teachers and students throughout the world who require an intuitive introduction to the subject without the notation and technical detail that characterize most textbooks. This overview has enabled students to make sense more easily of what instructors are doing when they produce proofs, theorems and formulas.

  • Birth of a Theorem

    In 2010, French mathematician C??dric Villani received the Fields Medal, the most coveted prize in mathematics, in recognition of a proof which he devised with his close collaborator Cl??ment Mouhot to explain one of the most surprising theories in classical physics. ,is Villani???s own account of the years leading up to the award. It invites readers inside the mind of a great mathematician as he wrestles with the most important work of his career.But you don???t have to understand nonlinear Landau damping to love ,. It doesn???t simplify or overexplain; rather, it invites readers into collaboration. Villani???s diaries, emails, and musings enmesh you in the process of discovery. You join him in unproductive lulls and late-night breakthroughs. You???re privy to the dining-hall conversations at the world???s greatest research institutions.,Villani shares his favorite songs, his love of manga, and the imaginative stories he tells his children. In mathematics, as in any creative work, it is the thinker???s whole life that propels discovery???and with ,, C??dric Villani welcomes you into his.

  • Bull by the Horns

    The former FDIC Chairwoman, and one of the first people to acknowledge the full risk of subprime loans, offers a unique perspective on the greatest crisis the US has faced since the Great Depression.,???When Sheila Bair took over as head of the U.S. Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. in 2006, the agency was probably better known for the ???FDIC??? logo on the doors of the nation???s banks than for anything it did. Now Bair is at the center of the financial crisis, speeding the takeover of failing banks and pressing the mortgage industry to ease loan terms . . . winning praise from Democrats and Republicans.??? ???BLOOMBERG NEWS, October 3, 2008,Sheila Bair is widely acknowledged in government circles and the media as one of the first people to identify and accurately assess the subprime crisis. Appointed by George W. Bush as the chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) in 2006, she witnessed the origins of the financial crisis and in 2008 became???along with Hank Paulson, Ben Bernanke, and Timothy Geithner???one of the key players trying to repair the damage to our economy. ,is her remarkable and refreshingly honest account of that contentious time and the struggle for reform that followed and continues to this day.

  • Bull!

    In 1982, the Dow hovered below 1000. Then, the market rose and rapidly gained speed until it peaked above 11,000. Noted journalist and financial reporter Maggie Mahar has written the first book on the remarkable bull market that began in 1982 and ended just in the early 2000s. For almost two decades, a colorful cast of characters such as Abby Joseph Cohen, Mary Meeker, Henry Blodget, and Alan Greenspan came to dominate the market news.,This inside look at that 17-year cycle of growth, built upon interviews and unparalleled access to the most important analysts, market observers, and fund managers who eagerly tell the tales of excesses, presents the period with a historical perspective and explains what really happened and why.

  • Confessions of a Philosopher

    In this infectiously exciting book, Bryan Magee tells the story of his own discovery of philosophy and not only makes it come alive but shows its relevance to daily life. Magee is the Carl Sagan of philosophy, the great popularizer of the subject, and author of a major new introductory history, The Story of Philosophy.,Confessions follows the course of Magee’s life, exploring philosophers and ideas as he himself encountered them, introducing all the great figures and their ideas, from the pre-Socratics to Bertrand Russell and Karl Popper, including Wittgenstein, Kant, Nietzsche, and Schopenhauer, rationalism, utilitarianism, empiricism, and existentialism.

  • Consciousness

    “The last great mystery for science,” consciousness has become a controversial topic.,???, challenges readers to reconsider key concepts such as personality, free will, and the soul. How can a physical brain create our experience of the world? What creates our identity? Do we really have free will? Could consciousness itself be an illusion? Exciting new developments in brain science are opening up these debates, and the field has now expanded to include biologists, neuroscientists, psychologists, and philosophers. This book clarifies the potentially confusing arguments and clearly describes the major theories, with illustrations and lively cartoons to help explain the experiments. Topics include vision and attention, theories of self, experiments on action and awareness, altered states of consciousness, and the effects of brain damage and drugs.,This lively, engaging, and authoritative book provides a clear overview of the subject that combines the perspectives of philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience–and serves as a much-needed launch pad for further exploration of this complicated and unsolved issue.

  • Elements of Information Theory

    The Second Edition of this fundamental textbook maintains the book’s tradition of clear, thought-provoking instruction. Readers are provided once again with an instructive mix of mathematics, physics, statistics, and information theory.,All the essential topics in information theory are covered in detail, including entropy, data compression, channel capacity, rate distortion, network information theory, and hypothesis testing. The authors provide readers with a solid understanding of the underlying theory and applications. Problem sets and a telegraphic summary at the end of each chapter further assist readers. The historical notes that follow each chapter recap the main points.

  • Explaining Social Behavior

    This book is an expanded and revised edition of the author’s critically acclaimed volume Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences. In twenty-six succinct chapters, Jon Elster provides an account of the nature of explanation in the social sciences. He offers an overview of key explanatory mechanisms in the social sciences, relying on hundreds of examples and drawing on a large variety of sources-psychology, behavioral economics, biology, political science, historical writings, philosophy and fiction. Written in accessible and jargon-free language, Elster aims at accuracy and clarity while eschewing formal models.

  • Financial Derivatives

    Combining their corporate and academic experiences, Jamil Baz and George Chacko offer financial analysts a complete, succinct account of the principles of financial derivatives pricing. Readers with a basic knowledge of finance, calculus, probability and statistics will learn about the most powerful tools in applied finance: equity derivatives, interest rate markets, and the mathematics of pricing. Baz and Chacko apply concepts such as volatility and time, and generic pricing to the valuation of conventional and more specialized cases.

  • Free The Animal

    In his book, Richard shares his tips for eating, fasting, and exercising as wild humans did for millennia. Find out how to embrace your primal cravings for nutritionally dense animal proteins and fiber-rich plant sources. Learn to stop listening to so-called experts and start tuning into your body’s natural signals. Richard’s approach to the Paleo lifestyle will help you lose fat, gain muscle, and unleash the energy of the animal inside you.

  • Good Calories, Bad Calories

    For decades we have been taught that fat is bad for us, carbohydrates better, and that the key to a healthy weight is eating less and exercising more. Yet despite this advice, we have seen unprecedented epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Taubes argues that the problem lies in refined carbohydrates, like white flour, easily digested starches, and sugars, and that the key to good health is the kind of calories we take in, not the number.,Called ???a very important book,??? by Andrew Weil and ?????? destined to change the way we think about food,??? by Michael Pollan, this groundbreaking book by award-winning science writer Gary Taubes shows us that almost everything we believe about the nature of a healthy diet is wrong.

  • Happy Accidents

    This is Morton Meyers’ fascinating, entertaining, and highly accessible look at the surprising role serendipity played in some of the most important medical discoveries in the 20th century. Though within the scientific community a certain stigma is attached to chance discovery because it is wrongly seen as pure luck, happy accidents happen every day and Meyers shows how it takes intelligence, insight, and creativity to recognize a “Eureka! I found what I wasn’t look for!” moment and know what to do next. Penicillin, chemotherapy drugs, X-rays, Valium, the Pap smear, and Viagra were all discovered accidentally, stumbled upon in search of something else. In discussing these medical breakthroughs and others, Dr. Meyers makes a cogent, highly engaging argument for a more creative, rather than purely linear, approach to science.

  • History of the Mind

    This book is a tour-de-force on how human consciousness may have evolved. From the “phantom pain” experienced by people who have lost their limbs to the uncanny faculty of “blindsight,” Humphrey argues that raw sensations are central to all conscious states and that consciousness must have evolved, just like all other mental faculties, over time from our ancestors’ bodily responses to pain and pleasure.

  • How Nature Works

    Self-organized criticality, the spontaneous development of systems to a critical state, is the first general theory of complex systems with a firm mathematical basis. This theory describes how many seemingly desperate aspects of the world, from stock market crashes to mass extinctions, avalanches to solar flares, all share a set of simple, easily described properties.

  • I Think, Therefore I Laugh

    The preeminent explicator of mathematical logic to non-mathematicians, John Allen Paulos is familiar to general readers not only from his bestselling books but also from his media appearances, including The David Letterman Show and National Public Radio’s “Talk of the Nation” and “Science Friday,” as well as articles in ,and ,???,Paulos originally wrote this charming little book on analytic logic, its mathematics, and its puzzles in 1985. And as in his later books, he uses jokes, stories, parables, and anecdotes to elucidate difficult concepts, in this case, some of the fundamental problems in modern philosophy.

  • Idea Makers

    This book of thoroughly engaging essays from one of today’s most prodigious,innovators provides a uniquely personal perspective on the lives and achievements of a selection of intriguing figures from the history of science and technology. Weaving together his immersive interest in people and history with insights gathered from his own experiences, Stephen Wolfram gives an ennobling look at some of the individuals whose ideas and creations have helped shape our world today.

  • Information

    Confronting us at every turn, flowing from every imaginable source, information defines our era–and yet what we don’t know about it could–and does–fill a book. In this indispensable volume, a primer for the information age, Hans Christian von Baeyer presents a clear description of what information is, how concepts of its measurement, meaning, and transmission evolved, and what its ever-expanding presence portends for the future.,Information is poised to replace matter as the primary stuff of the universe, von Baeyer suggests; it will provide a new basic framework for describing and predicting reality in the twenty-first century. Despite its revolutionary premise, von Baeyer’s book is written simply in a straightforward fashion, offering a wonderfully accessible introduction to classical and quantum information. Enlivened with anecdotes from the lives of philosophers, mathematicians, and scientists who have contributed significantly to the field, Information conducts readers from questions of subjectivity inherent in classical information to the blurring of distinctions between computers and what they measure or store in our quantum age. A great advance in our efforts to define and describe the nature of information, the book also marks an important step forward in our ability to exploit information–and, ultimately, to transform the nature of our relationship with the physical universe.

  • Intellectuals in the Middle Ages

    In this pioneering work Jacques Le Goff examines both the creation of the medieval universities in the great cities of the European High Middle Ages, and the linked origins of the intellectuals ??? the first Europeans since the Classic Age to owe their livelihoods to their teaching and accumulation of knowledge.,The author???s argument is that the intellectuals, Abelard most typically, were a new category of person (neither monk nor knight) with a new method (scholastic dialectic) and a new objective (knowledge for its own sake). For the first time in Spain, France, England and Germany the luxury of thinking and learning ceased to be the limited preserve of the higher echelons of the Church and the Court. The effect, the author shows, was to bring about an irreversible shift in European culture.,This intellectual history of medieval Europe (translated from the revised French edition of 1984) will be widely welcomed by students and scholars of the Middle Ages throughout the English???speaking world.