Jessica Gomes is an Australian model who appeared in the Swimsuit Issue of the American publication Sports Illustrated every year from 2008 to 2015. She works extensively in Australia and Asia. Gomes was the featured spokesperson for Australian company David Jones Limited from 2013 to Dec 2019.

  • Locking Up Our Own

    In recent years, America???s criminal justice system has become the subject of an increasingly urgent debate. Critics have assailed the rise of mass incarceration, emphasizing its disproportionate impact on people of color. As James Forman, Jr., points out, however, the war on crime that began in the 1970s was supported by many African American leaders in the nation???s urban centers. In , he seeks to understand why.,Forman shows us that the first substantial cohort of black mayors, judges, and police chiefs took office amid a surge in crime and drug addiction. Many prominent black officials, including Washington, D.C. mayor Marion Barry and federal prosecutor Eric Holder, feared that the gains of the civil rights movement were being undermined by lawlessness???and thus embraced tough-on-crime measures, including longer sentences and aggressive police tactics. In the face of skyrocketing murder rates and the proliferation of open-air drug markets, they believed they had no choice. But the policies they adopted would have devastating consequences for residents of poor black neighborhoods.,A former D.C. public defender, Forman tells riveting stories of politicians, community activists, police officers, defendants, and crime victims. He writes with compassion about individuals trapped in terrible dilemmas???from the men and women he represented in court to officials struggling to respond to a public safety emergency. , enriches our understanding of why our society became so punitive and offers important lessons to anyone concerned about the future of race and the criminal justice system in this country.

  • Negroland

    At once incendiary and icy, mischievous and provocative, celebratory and elegiac???here is a deeply felt meditation on race, sex, and American culture through the prism of the author???s rarefied upbringing and education among a black elite concerned with distancing itself from whites and the black generality while tirelessly measuring itself against both.,Born in upper-crust black Chicago???her father was for years head of pediatrics at Provident, at the time the nation???s oldest black hospital; her mother was a socialite???Margo Jefferson has spent most of her life among (call them what you will) the colored aristocracy, the colored elite, the blue-vein society. Since the nineteenth century they have stood apart, these inhabitants of ,, ???a small region of Negro America where residents were sheltered by a certain amount of privilege and plenty.???,Reckoning with the strictures and demands of , at crucial historical moments???the civil rights movement, the dawn of feminism, the fallacy of postracial America???Jefferson brilliantly charts the twists and turns of a life informed by psychological and moral contradictions. Aware as it is of heart-wrenching despair and depression, this book is a triumphant paean to the grace of perseverance.

  • Reporting Civil Rights

    From A. Philip Randolph’s defiant call in 1941 for African Americans to march on Washington to Alice Walker in 1973, “Reporting Civil Rights” presents firsthand accounts of the revolutionary events that overthrew segregation in the United States. This two-volume anthology brings together for the first time nearly 200 newspaper and magazine reports and book excerpts, and features 151 writers, including James Baldwin, Robert Penn Warren, David Halberstam, Lillian Smith, Gordon Parks, Murray Kempton, Ted Poston, Claude Sitton, and Anne Moody. A newly researched chronology of the movement, a 32-page insert of rare journalist photographs, and original biographical profiles are included in each volume,Roi Ottley and Sterling Brown record African American anger during World War II; Carl Rowan examines school segregation; Dan Wakefield and William Bradford Huie describe Emmett Till’s savage murder; and Ted Poston provides a fascinating early portrait of Martin Luther King, Jr. In the early 1960s, John Steinbeck witnesses the intense hatred of anti-integration protesters in New Orleans; Charlayne Hunter recounts the hostility she faced at the University of Georgia; Raymond Coffey records the determination of jailed children in Birmingham; Russell Baker and Michael Thelwell cover the March on Washington; John Hersey and Alice Lake witness fear and bravery in Mississippi, while James Baldwin and Norman Podhoretz explore northern race relations.,Singly or together, “Reporting Civil Rights” captures firsthand the impassioned struggle for freedom and equality that transformed America.

  • The Rebellious Slave

    How did the bloodiest slave uprising in American history–once thought to have involved hundreds of conspirators, black and white, free and enslaved–come to be known simply as “Nat Turner’s Rebellion”? And why does the enigmatic figure of the rebellious slave resonate so powerfully across American history?,In this richly detailed study spanning the eras of slavery, Jim Crow, and civil rights, Scot French places the contested history and enduring memory of Nat Turner???s Rebellion within the broader context of the black freedom struggle. French builds his narrative around close readings of historical texts, both famous and obscure, from early American prophecies of slave rebellion to William Styron’s 1967 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about Turner. He devotes considerable attention to the interplay between quasi-official narratives, such as “The Confessions of Nat Turner” by Thomas R. Gray, and less authoritative sources, such as rumor and oral tradition. Whereas most historians accept “The Confessions” as gospel, French presents several compelling counternarratives that point to a wider conspiracy. A groundbreaking work of American history, analogous to Merrill D. Peterson???s Abraham Lincoln in American Memory and Nell Painter???s Sojourner Truth: A Life, a Symbol, The Rebellious Slave will alter our views of both slavery and its complex, ever-changing legacy.,???Nat Turner was neither the first nor the last American slave to rise in arms against his oppressors,??? French writes. ???Yet he stands alone in American culture as the epitome of the rebellious slave, a black man whose words and deeds challenged the white slaveholding South and awakened a slumbering nation. A maker of history in his own day, Turner has been made to serve the most pressing needs of every generation since. In remembering Nat Turner, Americans must boldly confront–or deftly evade, at their peril–the intertwined legacies of slavery and racism in a nation founded on revolutionary ideals of freedom and equality.???

  • Will You Die With Me?

    Amid the social turmoil of the 1960s and,70s, a young man in California found his purpose in the rise of the Black Panther Party, made a deadly mistake that cost him his freedom, and ultimately got his life back, having learned the true lessons of the Buddha Samurai.By the time Flores Forbes was twenty-five years old, he had just a GED and sixty college credits to his name. But he had gone far in his chosen profession as a revolutionary. In 1977, Forbes had been in the Black Panther Party for almost a decade and had become the youngest member of the organization’s central committee. In this remarkable memoir, Forbes vividly describes his transformation from an angry youth into a powerful partisan in the ranks of the black liberation movement. Disillusioned in high school by the racism in his native San Diego, he began reading Black Panther literature. Drawn to the Panthers’ mission of organizing resistance to police brutality, he eagerly joined and soon found himself immersed in a culture of Mao-inspired rigor. His dedication ultimately earned him a place in the Party’s elite inner circle as assistant chief of staff, charged with heading up the “fold” — the heavily armed military branch dubbed by Huey P. Newton the “Buddha Samurai.” “My job was one of the most secretive in the party,” writes Forbes, “and to this day most of the people who were in the Party over the years had not a clue as to what I really did…”,With intimate portraits of such BPP leaders as Elaine Brown, Eldridge Cleaver, and Huey P. Newton, “Will You Die with Me?” is a riveting firsthand look at some of the most dramatic events of the last century and a brutally honest tale of one man’s journey from rage toredemption.