Frank Chimero is a successful designer, illustrator, and author based in New York. His clients range from Nike to NPR and his work has been featured in Monocle, The Atlantic, Time, Slate and The New Yorker.

  • “Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!”

    One of the most famous science books of our time, the phenomenal national bestseller that “buzzes with energy, anecdote and life. It almost makes you want to become a physicist” (Science Digest).,Richard P. Feynman, winner of the Nobel Prize in physics, thrived on outrageous adventures. In this lively work that ???can shatter the stereotype of the stuffy scientist??? (Detroit Free Press), Feynman recounts his experiences trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and cracking the uncrackable safes guarding the most deeply held nuclear secrets???and much more of an eyebrow-raising nature. In his stories, Feynman???s life shines through in all its eccentric glory???a combustible mixture of high intelligence, unlimited curiosity, and raging chutzpah.

  • A Liberated Mind

    Life is not a problem to be solved. ACT shows how we can live full and meaningful lives by embracing our vulnerability and turning toward what hurts.,In this landmark book, the originator and pioneering researcher into Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) lays out the psychological flexibility skills that make it one of the most powerful approaches research has yet to offer. These skills have been shown to help even where other approaches have failed. Science shows that they are useful in virtually every area–mental health (anxiety, depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, PTSD); physical health (chronic pain, dealing with diabetes, facing cancer); social processes (relationship issues, prejudice, stigma, domestic violence); and performance (sports, business, diet, exercise).,How does psychological flexibility help? We struggle because the problem-solving mind tells us to run from what causes us fear and hurt. But we hurt where we care. If we run from a sense of vulnerability, we must also run from what we care about. By learning how to liberate ourselves, we can live with meaning and purpose, along with our pain when there is pain.,Although that is a simple idea, it resists our instincts and programming. The flexibility skills counter those ingrained tendencies. They include noticing our thoughts with curiosity, opening to our emotions, attending to what is in the present, learning the art of perspective taking, discovering our deepest values, and building habits based around what we deeply want.,Beginning with the epiphany Steven Hayes had during a panic attack, this book is a powerful narrative of scientific discovery filled with moving stories as well as advice for how we can put flexibility skills to work immediately. Hayes shows how allowing ourselves to feel fully and think freely moves us toward commitment to what truly matters to us. Finally, we can live lives that reflect the qualities we choose.

  • A Philosophy of Walking

    In A Philosophy of Walking, a bestseller in France, leading thinker Fr??d??ric Gros charts the many different ways we get from A to B ??? the pilgrimage, the promenade, the protest march, the nature ramble ??? and reveals what they say about us.,Gros draws attention to other thinkers who also saw walking as something central to their practice. On his travels he ponders Thoreau???s eager seclusion in Walden Woods; the reason Rimbaud walked in a fury, while Nerval rambled to cure his melancholy. He shows us how Rousseau walked in order to think, while Nietzsche wandered the mountainside to write. In contrast, Kant marched through his hometown every day, exactly at the same hour, to escape the compulsion of thought. Brilliant and erudite, A Philosophy of Walking is an entertaining and insightful manifesto for putting one foot in front of the other.

  • A Room of One’s Own

    is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf. First published on the 24th of October, 1929, the essay was based on a series of lectures she delivered at Newnham College and Girton College, two women’s colleges at Cambridge University in October 1928. While this extended essay in fact employs a fictional narrator and narrative to explore women both as writers of and characters in fiction, the manuscript for the delivery of the series of lectures, titled Women and Fiction, and hence the essay, are considered nonfiction. The essay is seen as a feminist text, and is noted in its argument for both a literal and figural space for women writers within a literary tradition dominated by patriarchy.

  • A Wizard of Earthsea

    Ged, the greatest sorcerer in all Earthsea, was called Sparrowhawk in his reckless youth.,Hungry for power and knowledge, Sparrowhawk tampered with long-held secrets and loosed a terrible shadow upon the world. This is the tale of his testing, how he mastered the mighty words of power, tamed an ancient dragon, and crossed death’s threshold to restore the balance.

  • An Everlasting Meal

    How to Cook a Wolf,An Everlasting Meal ,???,Through the insightful essays in ,Tamar Adler issues a rallying cry to home cooks.,In chapters about boiling water, cooking eggs and beans, and summoning respectable meals from empty cupboards, Tamar weaves philosophy and instruction into approachable lessons on instinctive cooking. Tamar shows how to make the most of everything you buy, demonstrating what the world???s great chefs know: that great meals rely on the bones and peels and ends of meals before them.,She explains how to smarten up simple food and gives advice for fixing dishes gone awry. She recommends turning to neglected onions, celery, and potatoes for inexpensive meals that taste full of fresh vegetables, and cooking meat and fish resourcefully.,By wresting cooking from doctrine and doldrums, Tamar encourages readers to begin from wherever they are, with whatever they have. ,is elegant testimony to the value of cooking and an empowering, indispensable tool for eaters today.

  • Art and Fear

    This is a book about making art. Ordinary art. Ordinary art means something like: all art not made by Mozart. After all, art is rarely made by Mozart-like people; essentially-statistically speaking-there aren’t any people like that. Geniuses get made once-a-century or so, yet good art gets made all the time, so to equate the making of art with the workings of genius removes this intimately human activity to a strangely unreachable and unknowable place. For all practical purposes making art can be examined in great detail without ever getting entangled in the very remote problems of genius.

  • Atomic Habits

    No matter your goals, , offers a proven framework for improving–every day. James Clear, one of the world’s leading experts on habit formation, reveals practical strategies that will teach you exactly how to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that lead to remarkable results.,If you’re having trouble changing your habits, the problem isn’t you. The problem is your system. Bad habits repeat themselves again and again not because you don’t want to change, but because you have the wrong system for change. You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems. Here, you’ll get a proven system that can take you to new heights.,Clear is known for his ability to distill complex topics into simple behaviors that can be easily applied to daily life and work. Here, he draws on the most proven ideas from biology, psychology, and neuroscience to create an easy-to-understand guide for making good habits inevitable and bad habits impossible. Along the way, readers will be inspired and entertained with true stories from Olympic gold medalists, award-winning artists, business leaders, life-saving physicians, and star comedians who have used the science of small habits to master their craft and vault to the top of their field.,Learn how to:, will reshape the way you think about progress and success, and give you the tools and strategies you need to transform your habits–whether you are a team looking to win a championship, an organization hoping to redefine an industry, or simply an individual who wishes to quit smoking, lose weight, reduce stress, or achieve any other goal., is a useful book. It???s actionable, practical and written in clear and precise no-bullshit prose. One of the key themes throughout , is automating your life, the idea that “, takes you through the psychological, scientific, and anecdotal evidence of habit formation, with practical examples and tips to help you create a new habit or eliminate a bad one. He focuses on the small wins???making 1% improvements every day that form the foundations of a good habit. Over time, these small improvements become the architect of our lives.

  • Augustus

    A brilliant and beautifully written novel in the tradition of Robert Graves, , is a sweeping narrative that brings vividly to life a compelling cast of historical figures through their letters, dispatches, and memoirs.,A mere eighteen years of age when his uncle, Julius Caesar, is murdered, Octavius Caesar prematurely inherits rule of the Roman Republic. Surrounded by men who are jockeying for power???Cicero, Brutus, Cassius, and Mark Antony???young Octavius must work against the powerful Roman political machinations to claim his destiny as first Roman emperor. Sprung from meticulous research and the pen of a true poet, , tells the story of one man???s dream to liberate a corrupt Rome from the fancy of the capriciously crooked and the wildly wealthy.

  • Ballad

    This image-based story builds page by page, over seven sequences. The initial sequence consists of three images: beginning, middle and end of a journey. The following six sequences take up this same story, but with new details and extra images added each time. The story thus quickly becomes enormous as the number of new images doubles with each sequence.

  • Baron in the Trees

    A landmark new translation of a Calvino classic, a whimsical, spirited novel that imagines a life lived entirely on its own terms,Cosimo di Rond??, a young Italian nobleman of the eighteenth century, rebels against his parents by climbing into the trees and remaining there for the rest of his life. He adapts efficiently to an existence in the forest canopy???he hunts, sows crops, plays games with earth-bound friends, fights forest fires, solves engineering problems, and even manages to have love affairs. From his perch in the trees, Cosimo sees the Age of Enlightenment pass by, and a new century dawn.,The Baron in the Trees exemplifies Calvino???s peerless ability to weave tales that sparkle with enchantment. This new English rendering by acclaimed translator Ann Goldstein breathes new life into one of Calvino???s most beloved works.

  • Boom Town

    Award-winning journalist Sam Anderson???s long-awaited debut is a brilliant, kaleidoscopic narrative of Oklahoma City–a great American story of civics, basketball, and destiny.,Oklahoma City was born from chaos. It was founded in a bizarre but momentous “Land Run” in 1889, when thousands of people lined up along the borders of Oklahoma Territory and rushed in at noon to stake their claims. Since then, it has been a city torn between the wild energy that drives its outsized ambitions, and the forces of order that seek sustainable progress. Nowhere was this dynamic better realized than in the drama of the Oklahoma City Thunder basketball team’s 2012-13 season, when the Thunder’s brilliant general manager, Sam Presti, ignited a firestorm by trading future superstar James Harden just days before the first game. Presti’s all-in gamble on “the Process”???the patient, methodical management style that dictated the trade as the team???s best hope for long-term greatness???kicked off a pivotal year in the city’s history, one that would include pitched battles over urban planning, a series of cataclysmic tornadoes, and the frenzied hope that an NBA championship might finally deliver the glory of which the city had always dreamed.,Boom Town announces the arrival of an exciting literary voice. Sam Anderson, former book critic for , magazine and now a staff writer at the , magazine, unfolds an idiosyncratic mix of American history, sports reporting, urban studies, gonzo memoir, and much more to tell the strange but compelling story of an American city whose unique mix of geography and history make it a fascinating microcosm of the democratic experiment. Filled with characters ranging from NBA superstars Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook; to Flaming Lips oddball frontman Wayne Coyne; to legendary Great Plains meteorologist Gary England; to Stanley Draper, Oklahoma City’s would-be Robert Moses; to civil rights activist Clara Luper; to the citizens and public servants who survived the notorious 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah federal building, , offers a remarkable look at the urban tapestry woven from control and chaos, sports and civics.

  • Chronicle of a Death Foretold

    A man returns to the town where a baffling murder took place twenty-seven years earlier, determined to get to the bottom of the story. Just hours after marrying the beautiful Angela Vicario, everyone agrees, Bayardo San Roman returned his bride in disgrace to her parents. Her distraught family forced her to name her first lover; and her twin brothers announced their intention to murder Santiago Nasar for dishonoring their sister.,Yet if everyone knew the murder was going to happen, why did no one intervene to try and stop it? The more that is learned, the less is understood, and as the story races to its inexplicable conclusion, an entire society–not just a pair of murderers???is put on trial.

  • Consider the Oyster

    M.F.K. Fisher, whom John Updike has called our “poet of the appetites,” here pays tribute to that most delicate and enigmatic of foods—the oyster. As she tells of oysters found in stews, in soups, roasted, baked, fried, prepared ?? la Rockefeller or au naturel–and of the pearls sometimes found therein–Fisher describes her mother’s joy at encountering oyster loaf in a girls’ dorm in he 1890’s, recalls her own initiation into the “strange cold succulence” of raw oysters as a young woman in Marseille and Dijon, and explores both the bivalve’s famed aphrodisiac properties and its equally notorious gut-wrenching powers. Plumbing the “dreadful but exciting” life of the oyster, Fisher invites readers to share in the comforts and delights that this delicate edible evokes, and enchants us along the way with her characteristically wise and witty prose.

  • Crime and Punishment

    The two years before he wrote Crime and Punishment (1866) had been bad ones for Dostoyevsky. His wife and brother had died; the magazine he and his brother had started, Epoch, collapsed under its load of debt; and he was threatened with debtor’s prison. With an advance that he managed to wangle for an unwritten novel, he fled to Wiesbaden, hoping to win enough at the roulette table to get himself out of debt. Instead, he lost all his money; he had to pawn his clothes and beg friends for loans to pay his hotel bill and get back to Russia. One of his begging letters went to a magazine editor, asking for an advance on yet another unwritten novel ??? which he described as Crime and Punishment.,One of the supreme masterpieces of world literature, Crime and Punishment catapulted Dostoyevsky to the forefront of Russian writers and into the ranks of the world’s greatest novelists. Drawing upon experiences from his own prison days, the author recounts in feverish, compelling tones the story of Raskolnikov, an impoverished student tormented by his own nihilism, and the struggle between good and evil. Believing that he is above the law, and convinced that humanitarian ends justify vile means, he brutally murders an old woman ??? a pawnbroker whom he regards as “stupid, ailing, greedy???good for nothing.”,Overwhelmed afterwards by feelings of guilt and terror, Raskolnikov confesses to the crime and goes to prison. There he realizes that happiness and redemption can only be achieved through suffering. Infused with forceful religious, social, and philosophical elements, the novel was an immediate success.

  • Deep Work

    One of the most valuable skills in our economy is becoming increasingly rare. If you master this skill, you’ll achieve extraordinary results.,Deep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It’s a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time. Deep work will make you better at what you do and provide the sense of true fulfillment that comes from craftsmanship. In short, deep work is like a super power in our increasingly competitive twenty-first century economy. And yet, most people have lost the ability to go deep-spending their days instead in a frantic blur of e-mail and social media, not even realizing there’s a better way.,In DEEP WORK, author and professor Cal Newport flips the narrative on impact in a connected age. Instead of arguing distraction is bad, he instead celebrates the power of its opposite. Dividing this book into two parts, he first makes the case that in almost any profession, cultivating a deep work ethic will produce massive benefits. He then presents a rigorous training regimen, presented as a series of four “rules,” for transforming your mind and habits to support this skill.,A mix of cultural criticism and actionable advice, DEEP WORK takes the reader on a journey through memorable stories — from Carl Jung building a stone tower in the woods to focus his mind, to a social media pioneer buying a round-trip business class ticket to Tokyo to write a book free from distraction in the air — and no-nonsense advice, such as the claim that most serious professionals should quit social media and that you should practice being bored. DEEP WORK is an indispensable guide to anyone seeking focused success in a distracted world.,Few books have been as transformative for me as ,s ,. In an attention-deficit economy, we have lost our ability to focus and solve complex problems. As more companies embrace open offices, Slack, work-from-home policies and move towards ,, our attention spans are only getting shorter.,When was the last time you were able to focus on one task, uninterrupted, for just 60 minutes? Or when was the last time you managed to ???get some real work done???? In the first half of the book, Cal???s explains why deep work is so valuable and increasingly rare in today???s attention-deficit economy. Shallow work, on the other hand, is made up of non-cognitively demanding tasks that can be performed while semi-distracted. These jobs (and workers) are easily replicated and it???s a race-to-the-bottom for your career.,The ability to work deeply is perhaps , most valuable skill you can learn. It???s a skill that can be sharpened, practised, and leveraged in every aspect of your life. To master deep work, you can focus not just on ???getting things done??? but on ???getting valuable things done??? in less time.,???s company, , (now ,), was an early proponent of the value of deep work, cutting their employees??? workday to 4-days in 2012 and increasing productivity in parallel by promoting a distraction-free environment. More recently, , in Japan that led to a 40% increase in productivity by reducing distracting meetings, emails and ???shallow??? work.,In the 1980s, , famously adopted his own “,” where he spends two weeks alone in the forest twice a year. It is reported that he never missed these periods of deep work, no matter what was going on at Microsoft. Gates understands the value of ,.,A mix of cultural criticism and actionable advice, , will teach you practical steps to fight for more deep work in your life and to focus on what???s important. Read this book and then listen to the audiobook???make it still and it will instil positive changes in your career, habits and life.

  • Digital Minimalism

    Minimalism is the art of knowing how much is just enough. Digital minimalism applies this idea to our personal technology. It’s the key to living a focused life in an increasingly noisy world.,In this timely and enlightening book, the bestselling author of Deep Work introduces a philosophy for technology use that has already improved countless lives.,Digital minimalists are all around us. They’re the calm, happy people who can hold long conversations without furtive glances at their phones. They can get lost in a good book, a woodworking project, or a leisurely morning run. They can have fun with friends and family without the obsessive urge to document the experience. They stay informed about the news of the day, but don’t feel overwhelmed by it. They don’t experience “fear of missing out” because they already know which activities provide them meaning and satisfaction.,Now, Newport gives us a name for this quiet movement, and makes a persuasive case for its urgency in our tech-saturated world. Common sense tips, like turning off notifications, or occasional rituals like observing a digital sabbath, don’t go far enough in helping us take back control of our technological lives, and attempts to unplug completely are complicated by the demands of family, friends and work. What we need instead is a thoughtful method to decide what tools to use, for what purposes, and under what conditions.,Drawing on a diverse array of real-life examples, from Amish farmers to harried parents to Silicon Valley programmers, Newport identifies the common practices of digital minimalists and the ideas that underpin them. He shows how digital minimalists are rethinking their relationship to social media, rediscovering the pleasures of the offline world, and reconnecting with their inner selves through regular periods of solitude. He then shares strategies for integrating these practices into your life, starting with a thirty-day “digital declutter” process that has already helped thousands feel less overwhelmed and more in control.,Technology is intrinsically neither good nor bad. The key is using it to support your goals and values, rather than letting it use you. This book shows the way.,I approached ,???s , as the sequel to his hugely impactful ,. It???s the synthesis of Cal???s learnings over the three years since , was published and is a timely cultural critique on our reliance on technology and a practical guide to regaining control of our attention., is perhaps , most valuable skill you can learn and leverage in our attention-deficit society. In , Newport makes an unsettlingly strong case for how and why we should be reducing our use of technology (in particular, social media), and why we need to be more specific and careful about our use., is a philosophy that will teach you where to draw the line and how to focus this energy and attention on what matters instead; your goals and quality of life. Time off our digital devices is the key to living a focused life in a noisy world.

  • Do the Work

    Our enemy is not lack of preparation; it’s not the difficulty of the project, or the state of the marketplace or the emptiness of our bank account.,The enemy is resistance.,The enemy is our chattering brain, which, if we give it so much as a nanosecond, will start producing excuses, alibis, transparent self-justifications and a million reasons why he can’t/shouldn’t/won’t do what we know we need to do.,Start before you’re ready.

  • East of Eden

    A masterpiece of Biblical scope, and the magnum opus of one of America???s most enduring authors.,In his journal, Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck called , ???the first book,??? and indeed it has the primordial power and simplicity of myth. Set in the rich farmland of California???s Salinas Valley, this sprawling and often brutal novel follows the intertwined destinies of two families???the Trasks and the Hamiltons???whose generations helplessly reenact the fall of Adam and Eve and the poisonous rivalry of Cain and Abel.,The masterpiece of Steinbeck???s later years, ,is a work in which Steinbeck created his most mesmerizing characters and explored his most enduring themes: the mystery of identity, the inexplicability of love, and the murderous consequences of love’s absence. Adapted for the 1955 film directed by Elia Kazan introducing James Dean and read by thousands as the book that brought Oprah???s Book Club back, , has remained vitally present in American culture for over half a century.

  • Essentialism

    Have you ever found yourself stretched too thin?,Do you simultaneously feel overworked and underutilized?,Are you often busy but not productive?,Do you feel like your time is constantly being hijacked by other people???s agendas?,If you answered yes to any of these, the way out is the ,???,The Way of the Essentialist isn???t about getting more done in less time. It???s about getting , done. ??It is not ??a time management strategy, or a productivity technique. It is a , for discerning what is absolutely essential, then eliminating everything that is not, so we can make the highest possible contribution towards the things that really matter. ,By forcing us to apply a more selective criteria for what is Essential, the disciplined pursuit of less empowers us to reclaim control of our own choices about where to spend our precious time and energy ??? instead of giving others the implicit permission to choose for us.,Essentialism is not one more thing ??? it???s a whole new way of doing everything. A must-read for any leader, manager, or individual who wants to learn who to do less, but better, in every area of their lives, Essentialism ??is a movement whose time has come.,Often we get caught up in the busyness of life and lose focus on the things we want to do. ,???s , is a book that I think everyone should read. It focuses on an idea It is an idea whose time has come: do less. , clears your judgement and gives you permission to focus on what really matters instead of trying to do everything.??,In applying McKeown???s advice and defining strict criteria for what is essential in your life, you???ll reclaim invaluable time, energy and focus. McKeown calls this ???the disciplined pursuit of ,.???