• A Plea for the Animals

    A powerful and wide-ranging indictment of the treatment of animals by humans–and an eloquent plea for animal rights.,Every cow just wants to be happy. Every chicken just wants to be free. Every bear, dog, or mouse experiences sorrow and feels pain as intensely as any of us humans do. In a compelling appeal to reason and human kindness, Matthieu Ricard here takes the arguments from his best-sellers Altruism and Happiness to their logical conclusion: that compassion toward all beings, including our fellow animals, is a moral obligation and the direction toward which any enlightened society must aspire. ??He chronicles the appalling sufferings of the animals we eat, wear, and use for adornment or ???entertainment,??? and submits every traditional justification for their exploitation to scientific evidence and moral scrutiny. ??What arises is an unambiguous and ??powerful ethical imperative for treating all of the animals with whom we share this planet with respect and compassion.

  • Bright Lights, Big City

    With the publication of Bright Lights, Big City in 1984, Jay McInerney became a literary sensation, heralded as the voice of a generation. The novel follows a young man, living in Manhattan as if he owned it, through nightclubs, fashion shows, editorial offices, and loft parties as he attempts to outstrip mortality and the recurring approach of dawn. With nothing but goodwill, controlled substances, and wit to sustain him in this anti-quest, he runs until he reaches his reckoning point, where he is forced to acknowledge loss and, possibly, to rediscover his better instincts. This remarkable novel of youth and New York remains one of the most beloved, imitated, and iconic novels in America.

  • Cent ??l??phants sur un Brin D’Herbe

    Nearly twenty-five years after its original publication, , is still widely considered the most readable, yet substantive and wide-ranging, of His Holiness’ works. Broad in scope and revealing the depth of his knowledge, these teachings display the range of the Dalai Lama and his message, covering a plethora of topics, including: the need for compassion, the common goals of the world’s religions, karma, the four noble truths, the luminous nature of the mind, meditative concentration, selflessness, the two truths, and the fundamental innate mind of clear light that all the various schools of Tibetan Buddhism aim at manifesting. Although others in Tibet have mentioned that all orders of Tibetan Buddhism have the same basic outlook, the Dalai Lama is the first to explain in detail how this is so, his brilliant syncretic exposition being the final chapter in this book.,The book’s twenty chapters are deftly arranged in a developmental sequence so that readers easily understand the background needed to appreciate the more complex, later topics. Taken as a whole, the teachings in this book provide an accessible map of Tibetan spiritual culture.

  • Cooking with the Seasons

    Famous for his Washington restaurant, where he displays a breathtaking range of cuisine, Jean-Louis Palladin inspires food lovers everywhere to experiment, to learn, and to rejoice in the pleasures of the table.

  • Kitchen Confidential

    A deliciously funny, delectably shocking banquet of wild-but-true tales of life in the culinary trade from Chef Anthony Bourdain, laying out his more than a quarter-century of drugs, sex, and haute cuisine???now with all-new, never-before-published material.,New York Chef Tony Bourdain gives away secrets of the trade in his wickedly funny, inspiring memoir/expose. , reveals what Bourdain calls “twenty-five years of sex, drugs, bad behavior and haute cuisine.”

  • My Father’s Glory & My Mother’s Castle

    Bathed in the warm clarity of the summer sun in Provence, Marcel Pagnol’s childhood memories celebrate a time of rare beauty and delight.Called by Jean Renoir “the leading film artist of his age,” Pagnol is best known for such films as The Baker’s Wife, Harvest, Fanny, and Topaze, as well as the screen adaptations of his novels Jean de Florette and Manon of the Springs (North Point, 1988). But he never forgot the magic of his Provencal childhood, and when he set his memories to paper late in life the result was a great new success. My Father’s Glory and My Mother’s Castle appeared on the scene like a fresh breeze, captivating readers with its sweet enchantments. Pagnol recalls his days hunting and fishing in the hill country, his jaunts about Marseilles, his schoolboy diversions, and above all his family: his anticlerical father and sanctimonious uncle, his mild and beautiful mother, and many others. This bright and lively book sparkles with the charm and magic that were Marcel Pagnol’s own.

  • Paroles

    is a collection of poems by??,, first published in 1946. It was ranked 16th in Le Monde’s 100 Books of the Century.

  • Paul Bocuse’s French Cooking

    The great French chef offers nearly twelve hundred recipes, providing a wide range of dishes for every type of cook and for every occasion and a wide range of preparations for every meat, seafood, vegetable, fruit, and dairy product.

  • Sexus

    The first book of a trilogy of novels known collectively as “The Rosy Crucifixion”. It is autobiographical and tells the story of Miller’s first tempestuous marriage and his relentless sexual exploits in New York. The other books are “Plexus” and “Nexus”.

  • The Alchemist

    Combining magic, mysticism, wisdom and wonder into an inspiring tale of self-discovery, The Alchemist has become a modern classic, selling millions of copies around the world and transforming the lives of countless readers across generations. Paulo Coelho’s masterpiece tells the mystical story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure. His quest will lead him to riches far different???and far more satisfying???than he ever imagined. Santiago’s journey teaches us about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, of recognizing opportunity and learning to read the omens strewn along life’s path, and, most importantly, to follow our dreams.

  • The Prince

    As a young Florentine envoy to the courts of France and the Italian principalities, Niccol?? Machiavelli (1469???1527) was able to observe firsthand the lives of people strongly united under one powerful ruler. His fascination with that political rarity and his intense desire to see the Medici family assume a similar role in Italy provided the foundation for his “primer for princes.” In this classic guide to acquiring and maintaining political power, Machiavelli used a rational approach to advise prospective rulers, developing logical arguments and alternatives for a number of potential problems, among them governing hereditary monarchies, dealing with colonies and the treatment of conquered peoples.,Refreshing in its directness, yet often disturbing in its cold practicality, The Prince sets down a frighteningly pragmatic formula for political fortune. Starkly relevant to the political upheavals of the 20th century, this calculating prescription for power remains today, nearly 500 years after it was written, a timely and startling lesson in the practice of autocratic rule that continues to be much read and studied by students, scholars and general readers as well.

  • The Quantum and the Lotus

    Matthieu Ricard trained as a molecular biologist, working in the lab of a Nobel prize???winning scientist, but when he read some Buddhist philosophy, he became drawn to Buddhism. Eventually he left his life in science to study with Tibetan teachers, and he is now a Buddhist monk and translator for the Dalai Lama, living in the Shechen monastery near Kathmandu in Nepal. Trinh Thuan was born into a Buddhist family in Vietnam but became intrigued by the explosion of discoveries in astronomy during the 1960s. He made his way to the prestigious California Institute of Technology to study with some of the biggest names in the field and is now an acclaimed astrophysicist and specialist on how the galaxies formed.,When Matthieu Ricard and Trinh Thuan met at an academic conference in the summer of 1997, they began discussing the many remarkable connections between the teachings of Buddhism and the findings of recent science. That conversation grew into an astonishing correspondence exploring a series of fascinating questions. Did the universe have a beginning? Or is our universe one in a series of infinite universes with no end and no beginning? Is the concept of a beginning of time fundamentally flawed? Might our perception of time in fact be an illusion, a phenomenon created in our brains that has no ultimate reality? Is the stunning fine-tuning of the universe, which has produced just the right conditions for life to evolve, a sign that a ???principle of creation??? is at work in our world? If such a principle of creation undergirds the workings of the universe, what does that tell us about whether or not there is a divine Creator? How does the radical interpretation of reality offered by quantum physics conform to and yet differ from the Buddhist conception of reality? What is consciousness and how did it evolve? Can consciousness exist apart from a brain generating it?,The stimulating journey of discovery the authors traveled in their discussions is re-created beautifully in The Quantum and the Lotus, written in the style of a lively dialogue between friends. Both the fundamental teachings of Buddhism and the discoveries of contemporary science are introduced with great clarity, and the reader will be profoundly impressed by the many correspondences between the two streams of thought and revelation. Through the course of their dialogue, the authors reach a remarkable meeting of minds, ultimately offering a vital new understanding of the many ways in which science and Buddhism confirm and complement each other and of the ways in which, as Matthieu Ricard writes, ???knowledge of our spirits and knowledge of the world are mutually enlightening and empowering.???