Charles Koch is an American businessman, political donor and philanthropist. As of March 2019, he was ranked as the 11th-richest person in the world, with an estimated net worth of $50.5 billion.

  • Frames of Mind

    The book that revolutionized our understanding of human intelligence.,Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences has been hailed by educators for decades and applied in hundreds of schools worldwide. In Frames of Mind, Gardner challenges the widely held notion that intelligence is a single general capacity possessed by every individual to a greater or lesser extent. Amassing a wealth of evidence, Gardner posits the existence of eight different intelligences, each as important as the next, that comprise a unique cognitive profile for each person. In this updated edition, the author reflects on thirty years of work on Multiple Intelligences theory and practice.

  • Human Action

    “Human Action: A Treatise on Economics” is the first comprehensive treatise on economics written by a leading member of the modern Austrian school of economics. Von Mises contribution was very simple, yet at the same time extremely profound: he pointed out that the whole economy is the result of what individuals do. Individuals act, choose, cooperate, compete, and trade with one another. In this way Mises explained how complex market phenomena develop. Mises did not simply describe economic phenomena – prices, wages, interest rates, money, monopoly and even the trade cycle – he explained them as the outcomes of countless conscious, purposive actions, choices, and preferences of individuals, each of whom was trying as best as he or she could under the circumstances to attain various wants and ends and to avoid undesired consequences. Hence the title Mises chose for his economic treatise, “Human Action.”

  • Personal Knowledge

    The publication of Personal Knowledge in 1958 shook the science world, as Michael Polanyi took aim at the long-standing ideals of rigid empiricism and rule-bound logic. Today, Personal Knowledge remains one of the most significant philosophy of science books of the twentieth century, bringing the crucial concepts of ???tacit knowledge??? and ???personal knowledge??? to the forefront of inquiry.,In this remarkable treatise, Polanyi attests that our personal experiences and ways of sharing knowledge have a profound effect on scientific discovery. He argues against the idea of the wholly dispassionate researcher, pointing out that even in the strictest of sciences, knowing is still an art, and that personal commitment and passion are logically necessary parts of research. In our technological age where fact is split from value and science from humanity, Polanyi???s work continues to advocate for the innate curiosity and scientific leaps of faith that drive our most dazzling ingenuity.,For this expanded edition, Polyani scholar Mary Jo Nye set the philosopher-scientist???s work into contemporary context, offering fresh insights and providing a helpful guide to critical terms in the work. Used in fields as diverse as religious studies, chemistry, economics, and anthropology, Polanyi???s view of knowledge creation is just as relevant to intellectual endeavors today as when it first made waves more than fifty years ago.

  • Why Wages Rise

    In this book, F.A. Harper addresses the common fallacies surrounding wages. Harper discusses that wages are a result of efforts by the worker, not a labor union, and that the time spent improving one’s skills ultimately benefits the worker.