Brian Edward Cox OBE, FRS is an English physicist who serves as professor of particle physics in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Manchester.

  • “What Do You Care What Other People Think?”

    The , best-selling sequel to ,???,Like the “funny, brilliant, bawdy” (,) , this book???s many stories???some funny, others intensely moving???display Richard P. Feynman???s unquenchable thirst for adventure and unparalleled ability to recount important moments from his life.,Here we meet Feynman???s first wife, Arlene, who taught him of love???s irreducible mystery as she lay dying in a hospital bed while he worked on the atomic bomb at nearby Los Alamos. We listen to the fascinating narrative of the investigation into the space shuttle ,???s explosion in 1986 and relive the moment when Feynman revealed the disaster???s cause through an elegant experiment: dropping a ring of rubber into a glass of cold water and pulling it out, misshapen. In , one of the greatest physicists of the twentieth century lets us see the man behind the genius.

  • An Appetite for Wonder

    With the 2006 publication of The God Delusion, the name Richard Dawkins became a byword for ruthless skepticism and “brilliant, impassioned, articulate, impolite” debate (San Francisco Chronicle). his first memoir offers a more personal view.,His first book, The Selfish Gene, caused a seismic shift in the study of biology by proffering the gene-centered view of evolution. It was also in this book that Dawkins coined the term meme, a unit of cultural evolution, which has itself become a mainstay in contemporary culture.,In An Appetite for Wonder, Richard Dawkins shares a rare view into his early life, his intellectual awakening at Oxford, and his path to writing The Selfish Gene. He paints a vivid picture of his idyllic childhood in colonial Africa, peppered with sketches of his colorful ancestors, charming parents, and the peculiarities of colonial life right after World War II. At boarding school, despite a near-religious encounter with an Elvis record, he began his career as a skeptic by refusing to kneel for prayer in chapel. Despite some inspired teaching throughout primary and secondary school, it was only when he got to Oxford that his intellectual curiosity took full flight.,Arriving at Oxford in 1959, when undergraduates “left Elvis behind” for Bach or the Modern Jazz Quartet, Dawkins began to study zoology and was introduced to some of the university’s legendary mentors as well as its tutorial system. It’s to this unique educational system that Dawkins credits his awakening, as it invited young people to become scholars by encouraging them to pose rigorous questions and scour the library for the latest research rather than textbook “teaching to” any kind of test. His career as a fellow and lecturer at Oxford took an unexpected turn when, in 1973, a serious strike in Britain caused prolonged electricity cuts, and he was forced to pause his computer-based research. Provoked by the then widespread misunderstanding of natural selection known as “group selection” and inspired by the work of William Hamilton, Robert Trivers, and John Maynard Smith, he began to write a book he called, jokingly, “my bestseller.” It was, of course, The Selfish Gene.,Here, for the first time, is an intimate memoir of the childhood and intellectual development of the evolutionary biologist and world-famous atheist, and the story of how he came to write what is widely held to be one of the most important books of the twentieth century.

  • Cosmos

    Cosmos is one of the bestselling science books of all time. In clear-eyed prose, Sagan reveals a jewel-like blue world inhabited by a life form that is just beginning to discover its own identity and to venture into the vast ocean of space. Cosmos retraces the fourteen billion years of cosmic evolution that have transformed matter into consciousness, exploring such topics as the origin of life, the human brain, Egyptian hieroglyphics, spacecraft missions, the death of the Sun, the evolution of galaxies, and the forces and individuals who helped to shape modern science.,

  • Empire of the Clouds

    In 1945 Britain was the world’s leading designer and builder of aircraft – a world-class achievement that was not mere rhetoric. And what aircraft they were. The sleek Comet, the first jet airliner. The awesome delta-winged Vulcan, an intercontinental bomber that could be thrown about the sky like a fighter. The Hawker Hunter, the most beautiful fighter-jet ever built and the Lightning, which could zoom ten miles above the clouds in a couple of minutes and whose pilots rated flying it as better than sex.,How did Britain so lose the plot that today there is not a single aircraft manufacturer of any significance in the country? What became of the great industry of de Havilland or Handley Page? And what was it like to be alive in that marvellous post-war moment when innovative new British aircraft made their debut, and pilots were the rock stars of the age?,James Hamilton-Paterson captures that season of glory in a compelling book that fuses his own memories of being a schoolboy plane spotter with a ruefully realistic history of British decline – its loss of self confidence and power. It is the story of great and charismatic machines and the men who flew them: heroes such as Bill Waterton, Neville Duke, John Derry and Bill Beaumont who took inconceivable risks, so that we could fly without a second thought.

  • Gravity

    The aim of this groundbreaking new book is to bring general relativity into the undergraduate curriculum and make this fundamental theory accessible to all physics majors. Using a “physics first” approach to the subject, renowned relativist James B. Hartle provides a fluent and accessible introduction that uses a minimum of new mathematics and is illustrated with a wealth of exciting applications. The emphasis is on the exciting phenomena of gravitational physics and the growing connection between theory and observation. The Global Positioning System, black holes, X-ray sources, pulsars, quasars, gravitational waves, the Big Bang, and the large scale structure of the universe are used to illustrate the widespread role of how general relativity describes a wealth of everyday and exotic phenomena.

  • Great Myths of the Brain

    “Great Myths of the Brain” introduces readers to the field of neuroscience by examining popular myths about the human brain.,Explores commonly-held myths of the brain through the lens of scientific research, backing up claims with studies and other evidence from the literature. Looks at enduring myths such as “Do we only use 10% of our brain?,” “Pregnant women lose their mind,” “Right-brained people are more creative” and many more. Delves into myths relating to specific brain disorders, including epilepsy, autism, dementia, and others. Written engagingly and accessibly for students and lay readers alike, providing a unique introduction to the study of the brain. Teaches readers how to spot neuro hype and neuro-nonsense claims in the media.

  • Human Universe

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from.,What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe ??? any question ??? is the most wonderful thing.,Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don???t know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don???t understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile.,This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place in the universe. We have no right to expect answers; we have no right to even ask. But ask and wonder we do., is first and foremost a love letter to humanity; a celebration of our outrageous fortune in existing at all. I have chosen to write my letter in the language of science, because there is no better demonstration of our magnificent ascent from dust to paragon of animals than the exponentiation of knowledge generated by science. Two million years ago we were apemen. Now we are spacemen. That has happened, as far as we know, nowhere else. That is worth celebrating.

  • Leonardo???s Brain

    Best-selling author Leonard Shlain explores the potential for humankind through the life, art, and mind of the first true Renaissance man, Leonardo da Vinci. The author hypothesizes that da Vinci???s staggering range of achievements demonstrates a harbinger of the future of our species. Da Vinci???s innovations as an artist, scientist, and inventor are recast through a modern lens, with Shlain applying contemporary neuroscience to illuminate da Vinci???s creative process. No other person in human history has excelled in so many areas of innovation: Shlain reveals the how and the why.,Shlain theorizes that Leonardo???s extraordinary mind came from a uniquely developed and integrated right and left brain, and he offers a model for how we too can evolve. Using past and current research, , presents da Vinci as the focal point for a fresh exploration of human creativity. With his lucid style and remarkable ability to discern connections among a wide range of fields, Shlain brings the reader into the world of history???s greatest mind.

  • Life Ascending

    A renowned biochemist draws on cutting-edge scientific findings to construct the mosaic of life???s astounding history.,How did life invent itself? Where did DNA come from? How did consciousness develop? Powerful new research methods are providing vivid insights into the makeup of life. Comparing gene sequences, examining atomic structures of proteins, and looking into the geochemistry of rocks have helped explain evolution in more detail than ever before.,Nick Lane expertly reconstructs the history of life by describing the ten greatest inventions of evolution (including DNA, photosynthesis, sex, and sight), based on their historical impact, role in organisms today, and relevance to current controversies. Who would have guessed that eyes started off as light-sensitive spots used to calibrate photosynthesis in algae? Or that DNA???s building blocks form spontaneously in hydrothermal vents? Lane gives a gripping, lucid account of nature???s ingenuity, and the result is a work of essential reading for anyone who has ever pondered or questioned the science underlying evolution???s greatest gifts to man.

  • Starmus

    Never before has such an ambitious series of talks, articles, and recollections been assembled to celebrate the human exploration of space. It is the result of the unique Starmus meeting in 2011 on Tenerife, where the legendary Russian and American pioneers of the space age met up for the fi rst time to share the moments that electrified the human race.,Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, Bill Anders, Yuri Baturin, Charlie Duke, Victor Gorbatko, Alexei Leonov, Jim Lovell, Claude Nicollier, and Sergei Zhukov tell their personal stories about the fi rst space walk, the lunar landing, the heroic recovery of Apollo 13, the repair of the Hubble Space Telescope, and much more. Our discovery of the Universe, our place within it, and the meaning of life on Earth also forged dramatic moments at Starmus through the presentations of some of the worlds leading scientists and thinkers.

  • The Age of Wonder

    The Age of Wonder is a colorful and utterly absorbing history of the men and women whose discoveries and inventions at the end of the eighteenth century gave birth to the Romantic Age of Science. ,When young Joseph Banks stepped onto a Tahitian beach in 1769, he hoped to discover Paradise. Inspired by the scientific ferment sweeping through Britain, the botanist had sailed with Captain Cook in search of new worlds. Other voyages of discovery???astronomical, chemical, poetical, philosophical???swiftly follow in Richard Holmes’s thrilling evocation of the second scientific revolution. Through the lives of William Herschel and his sister Caroline, who forever changed the public conception of the solar system; of Humphry Davy, whose near-suicidal gas experiments revolutionized chemistry; and of the great Romantic writers, from Mary Shelley to Coleridge and Keats, who were inspired by the scientific breakthroughs of their day, Holmes brings to life the era in which we first realized both the awe-inspiring and the frightening possibilities of science???an era whose consequences are with us still.

  • The Blind Watchmaker

    Richard Dawkins???s classic remains the definitive argument for our modern understanding of evolution.,The Blind Watchmaker is the seminal text for understanding evolution today. In the eighteenth century, theologian William Paley developed a famous metaphor for creationism: that of the skilled watchmaker. In The Blind Watchmaker, Richard Dawkins crafts an elegant riposte to show that the complex process of Darwinian natural selection is unconscious and automatic. If natural selection can be said to play the role of a watchmaker in nature, it is a blind one???working without foresight or purpose.,In an eloquent, uniquely persuasive account of the theory of natural selection, Dawkins illustrates how simple organisms slowly change over time to create a world of enormous complexity, diversity, and beauty.

  • The Double Helix

    The classic personal account of Watson and Crick???s groundbreaking discovery of the structure of DNA, now with an introduction by Sylvia Nasar, author of A Beautiful Mind.,By identifying the structure of DNA, the molecule of life, Francis Crick and James Watson revolutionized biochemistry and won themselves a Nobel Prize. At the time, Watson was only twenty-four, a young scientist hungry to make his mark. His uncompromisingly honest account of the heady days of their thrilling sprint against other world-class researchers to solve one of science???s greatest mysteries gives a dazzlingly clear picture of a world of brilliant scientists with great gifts, very human ambitions, and bitter rivalries.,With humility unspoiled by false modesty, Watson relates his and Crick???s desperate efforts to beat Linus Pauling to the Holy Grail of life sciences, the identification of the basic building block of life. Never has a scientist been so truthful in capturing in words the flavor of his work.

  • The First Three Minutes

    A Nobel Prize-winning physicist explains what happened at the very beginning of the universe, and how we know, in this popular science classic.,Our universe has been growing for nearly 14 billion years. But almost everything about it, from the elements that forged stars, planets, and lifeforms, to the fundamental forces of physics, can be traced back to what happened in just the first three minutes of its life.,In this book, Nobel Laureate Steven Weinberg describes in wonderful detail what happened in these first three minutes. It is an exhilarating journey that begins with the Planck Epoch – the earliest period of time in the history of the universe – and goes through Einstein’s Theory of Relativity, the Hubble Red Shift, and the detection of the Cosmic Microwave Background. These incredible discoveries all form the foundation for what we now understand as the “standard model” of the origin of the universe. The First Three Minutes examines not only what this model looks like, but also tells the exciting story of the bold thinkers who put it together.,Clearly and accessibly written, The First Three Minutes is a modern-day classic, an unsurpassed explanation of where it is we really come from.

  • The Innovators

    Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, Walter Isaacson???s New York Times bestselling and critically acclaimed The Innovators is a ???riveting, propulsive, and at times deeply moving??? (The Atlantic) story of the people who created the computer and the Internet.,What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail?,The Innovators is a masterly saga of collaborative genius destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution???and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens. Isaacson begins the adventure with Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron???s daughter, who pioneered computer programming in the 1840s. He explores the fascinating personalities that created our current digital revolution, such as Vannevar Bush, Alan Turing, John von Neumann, J.C.R. Licklider, Doug Engelbart, Robert Noyce, Bill Gates, Steve Wozniak, Steve Jobs, Tim Berners-Lee, and Larry Page.,This is the story of how their minds worked and what made them so inventive. It???s also a narrative of how their ability to collaborate and master the art of teamwork made them even more creative. For an era that seeks to foster innovation, creativity, and teamwork, The Innovators is ???a sweeping and surprisingly tenderhearted history of the digital age??? (The New York Times).

  • The Perfect Meal

    The authors of , examine all of the elements that contribute to the diners experience of a meal (primarily at a restaurant) and investigate how each of the diners senses contributes to their overall multisensory experience. The principal focus of the book is not on flavor perception, but on all of the non-food and beverage factors that have been shown to influence the diners overall experience.

  • The Quantum Moment

    From multiverses and quantum leaps to Schr??dinger???s cat and time travel, quantum mechanics has irreversibly shaped the popular imagination. Entertainers and writers from Lady Gaga to David Foster Wallace take advantage of its associations and nuances. In ,, philosopher Robert P. Crease and physicist Alfred Scharff Goldhaber recount the fascinating story of how the quantum jumped from physics into popular culture, with brief explorations of the underlying math and physics concepts and descriptions of the fiery disputes among figures including Einstein, Schr??dinger, and Niels Bohr. Understanding and appreciating quantum imagery, its uses and abuses, is part of what it means to be an educated person in the twenty-first century. , serves as an indispensable guide.

  • Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension

    Maths is a game. This book can be cut, drawn in, folded into shapes and will even take you to the fourth dimension.,So join stand-up mathematician Matt Parker on a journey through narcissistic numbers, optimal dating algorithms, at least two different kinds of infinity and more.

  • What is Real

    The untold story of the heretical thinkers who dared to question the nature of our quantum universe,Every physicist agrees quantum mechanics is among humanity’s finest scientific achievements. But ask what it means, and the result will be a brawl. For a century, most physicists have followed Niels Bohr’s Copenhagen interpretation and dismissed questions about the reality underlying quantum physics as meaningless. A mishmash of solipsism and poor reasoning, Copenhagen endured, as Bohr’s students vigorously protected his legacy, and the physics community favored practical experiments over philosophical arguments. As a result, questioning the status quo long meant professional ruin. And yet, from the 1920s to today, physicists like John Bell, David Bohm, and Hugh Everett persisted in seeking the true meaning of quantum mechanics. , is the gripping story of this battle of ideas and of the courageous scientists who dared to stand up for truth.

  • World of Numbers

    This is a specially formatted fixed layout Kindle ebook which retains the look and feel of the printed book.,???Funny, yet with hidden depths ??? like its author!??? Brian Cox,From the building blocks of life, to the games we play, the food we eat, and the marvels of space, Australia???s funniest mathematician is back with a fascinating snapshot of the world of numbers.,What???s a ???firkin???? Is a tardigrade animal, vegetable or mineral? How fast is Usain Bolt ??? really? And what???s the record for the most lobster rolls eaten in 10 minutes? All these questions and more are answered in ,.,This is a book for young and old ??? for anyone who???s ever wondered how things work, who loves puzzles and numbers, or is just plain curious about the amazing world around us.,After his bestselling ,, Australia???s funniest and most famous mathematician is back by popular demand. Adam Spencer has been entertaining us for almost 20 years on triple j, ABC radio and television. You can find him on Twitter @adambspencer, on the web at adamspencer.com.au and on Facebook.