B.J. Novak is an American actor, writer, comedian, and director. Novak was one of the writers and executive producers of The Office, in which he also played Ryan Howard.

  • Daily Rituals

    Franz Kafka, frustrated with his living quarters and day job, wrote in a letter to Felice Bauer in 1912, ???time is short, my strength is limited, the office is a horror, the apartment is noisy, and if a pleasant, straightforward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle maneuvers.???,Kafka is one of 161 inspired???and inspiring???minds, among them, novelists, poets, playwrights, painters, philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians, who describe how they subtly maneuver the many (self-inflicted) obstacles and (self-imposed) daily rituals to get done the work they love to do, whether by waking early or staying up late; whether by self-medicating with doughnuts or bathing, drinking vast quantities of coffee, or taking long daily walks. Thomas Wolfe wrote standing up in the kitchen, the top of the refrigerator as his desk, dreamily fondling his ???male configurations???. . . Jean-Paul Sartre chewed on Corydrane tablets (a mix of amphetamine and aspirin), ingesting ten times the recommended dose each day . . . Descartes liked to linger in bed, his mind wandering in sleep through woods, gardens, and enchanted palaces where he experienced ???every pleasure imaginable.???

  • Easy Riders Raging Bulls

    When the low-budget biker movie Easy Rider shocked Hollywood with its success in 1969, a new Hollywood era was born. This was an age when talented young filmmakers such as Scorsese, Coppola, and Spielberg, along with a new breed of actors, including De Niro, Pacino, and Nicholson, became the powerful figures who would make such modern classics as The Godfather, Chinatown, Taxi Driver, and Jaws. Easy Riders, Raging Bulls follows the wild ride that was Hollywood in the ’70s — an unabashed celebration of sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll (both onscreen and off) and a climate where innovation and experimentation reigned supreme. Based on hundreds of interviews with the directors themselves, producers, stars, agents, writers, studio executives, spouses, and ex-spouses, this is the full, candid story of Hollywood’s last golden age.

  • The Big Book of Jewish Humor

    Two rival businessmen meet in the Warsaw train station. “Where are you going?” says the first man.,”To Minsk,” says the second.,”To Minsk, eh? What a nerve you have! I know you’re telling me you’re going to Minsk because you want me to think that you’re really going to Pinsk. But it so happens that I know you really are going to Minsk. So why are you lying to me?”,Four men are walking in the desert.,The German says, “I’m tired and thirsty. I must have a beer.”,The Italian says, “I’m tired and thirsty. I must have wine.”,The Mexican says, “I’m tired and thirsty.,I must have tequila.”,The Jew says, “I’m tired and thirsty. I must have diabetes.”

  • The Big Book of New American Humor

    Cartoons, short stories, movie strips, oneliners–humor from all genres fill this overstuffed book. Organized by subject, these hilarious entries feature a veritable who’s who of American humor with selections from people such as Woody Allen, Garrison Keillor, Nora Ephron and more. Illustrated.

  • The Oxford Book of Aphorisms

    An aphorism is “a short pithy statement or maxim,” but beneath this definition lies a wealth of wit and insight to which neither the word nor a brief description can do justice. This anthology demonstrates just how rewarding an art form the aphorism can be, and just how brilliantly the aphorist can illuminate the hidden truth, or lay bare the ironies of existence. Specific sections on desires and longings, self-doubt, fame and reputations, happiness and sorrow, cover the whole range of aphoristic literature. This book brings together the most diverse figures-the classic aphorists, like La Rochefoucauld; the philosophers, from the Greeks to Samuel Johnson to Virginia Woolf-as well as statesmen, scientists, boulevardiers, Olympians, and gadflies. John Gross draws on their wisdom and wit to produce an anthology that will be referred to time and time again.