• 12 Rules for Life

    What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson’s answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research.,Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.,What does the nervous system of the lowly lobster have to tell us about standing up straight (with our shoulders back) and about success in life? Why did ancient Egyptians worship the capacity to pay careful attention as the highest of gods? What dreadful paths do people tread when they become resentful, arrogant and vengeful? Dr. Peterson journeys broadly, discussing discipline, freedom, adventure and responsibility, distilling the world’s wisdom into 12 practical and profound rules for life.,???, shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith and human nature, while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its readers.

  • Alexander Hamilton

    A New York Times Bestseller, and the inspiration for the hit Broadway musical Hamilton!,Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ron Chernow presents a landmark biography of Alexander Hamilton, the Founding Father who galvanized, inspired, scandalized, and shaped the newborn nation.,In the first full-length biography of Alexander Hamilton in decades, Ron Chernow tells the riveting story of a man who overcame all odds to shape, inspire, and scandalize the newborn America. According to historian Joseph Ellis, Alexander Hamilton is ???a robust full-length portrait, in my view the best ever written, of the most brilliant, charismatic and dangerous founder of them all.???,Few figures in American history have been more hotly debated or more grossly misunderstood than Alexander Hamilton. Chernow???s biography gives Hamilton his due and sets the record straight, deftly illustrating that the political and economic greatness of today???s America is the result of Hamilton???s countless sacrifices to champion ideas that were often wildly disputed during his time. ???To repudiate his legacy,??? Chernow writes, ???is, in many ways, to repudiate the modern world.??? Chernow here recounts Hamilton???s turbulent life: an illegitimate, largely self-taught orphan from the Caribbean, he came out of nowhere to take America by storm, rising to become George Washington???s aide-de-camp in the Continental Army, coauthoring The Federalist Papers, founding the Bank of New York, leading the Federalist Party, and becoming the first Treasury Secretary of the United States.Historians have long told the story of America???s birth as the triumph of Jefferson???s democratic ideals over the aristocratic intentions of Hamilton. Chernow presents an entirely different man, whose legendary ambitions were motivated not merely by self-interest but by passionate patriotism and a stubborn will to build the foundations of American prosperity and power. His is a Hamilton far more human than we???ve encountered before???from his shame about his birth to his fiery aspirations, from his intimate relationships with childhood friends to his titanic feuds with Jefferson, Madison, Adams, Monroe, and Burr, and from his highly public affair with Maria Reynolds to his loving marriage to his loyal wife Eliza. And never before has there been a more vivid account of Hamilton???s famous and mysterious death in a duel with Aaron Burr in July of 1804.,Chernow???s biography is not just a portrait of Hamilton, but the story of America???s birth seen through its most central figure. At a critical time to look back to our roots, Alexander Hamilton will remind readers of the purpose of our institutions and our heritage as Americans.,???Nobody has captured Hamilton better than Chernow??? ???The New York Times Book Review ,Ron Chernow’s other biographies include: Grant, Washington, and Titan.

  • Areopagitica

    This is Milton’s astonishing call from 1644 for complete freedom of speech and an end to any government censorship. He argues passionately yet logically in a text that still has much to teach us today, and which gives a real insight into the genuine radicalism of the English Revolution. Anyone interested in the development of political thought and the history of the fight against government censorship should read this seminal and ground-breaking text.

  • Beware of Pity

    The great Austrian writer Stefan Zweig was a master anatomist of the deceitful heart, and ,, the only novel he published during his lifetime, uncovers the seed of selfishness within even the finest of feelings.,Hofmiller, an Austro-Hungarian cavalry officer stationed at the edge of the empire, is invited to a party at the home of a rich local landowner, a world away from the dreary routine of his barracks. The surroundings are glamorous, wine flows freely, and the exhilarated young Hofmiller asks his host’s lovely daughter for a dance, only to discover that sickness has left her painfully crippled. It is a minor blunder, yet one that will go on to destroy his life, as pity and guilt gradually implicate him in a well-meaning but tragically wrongheaded plot to restore the unhappy invalid to health.,”Stefan Zweig was a dark and unorthodox artist; it’s good to have him back.” ???Salman Rushdie

  • Chaos Monkeys

    meets , in an irreverent expos?? of life inside the tech bubble, from industry provocateur Antonio Garc??a Mart??nez, a former Twitter advisor, Facebook product manager and startup founder/CEO.,???,Imagine a chimpanzee rampaging through a datacenter powering everything from Google to Facebook. Infrastructure engineers use a software version of this ???chaos monkey??? to test online services??? robustness???their ability to survive random failure and correct mistakes before they actually occur. Tech entrepreneurs are society???s chaos monkeys, disruptors testing and transforming every aspect of our lives, from transportation (Uber) and lodging (AirBnB) to television (Netflix) and dating (Tinder). One of Silicon Valley???s most audacious chaos monkeys is Antonio Garc??a Mart??nez.,After stints on Wall Street and as CEO of his own startup, Garc??a Mart??nez joined Facebook???s nascent advertising team, turning its users??? data into profit for COO Sheryl Sandberg and chairman and CEO Mark ???Zuck??? Zuckerberg. Forced out in the wake of an internal product war over the future of the company???s monetization strategy, Garc??a Mart??nez eventually landed at rival Twitter. He also fathered two children with a woman he barely knew, committed lewd acts and brewed illegal beer on the Facebook campus (accidentally flooding Zuckerberg’s desk), lived on a sailboat, raced sport cars on the 101, and enthusiastically pursued the life of an overpaid Silicon Valley wastrel.,Now, this gleeful contrarian unravels the chaotic evolution of social media and online marketing and reveals how it is invading our lives and shaping our future. Weighing in on everything from startups and credit derivatives to Big Brother and data tracking, social media monetization and digital ???privacy,??? Garc??a Mart??nez shares his scathing observations and outrageous antics, taking us on a humorous, subversive tour of the fascinatingly insular tech industry. , lays bare the hijinks, trade secrets, and power plays of the visionaries, grunts, sociopaths, opportunists, accidental tourists, and money cowboys who are revolutionizing our world. The question is, will we survive?

  • Everything

    Aphorisms are often derided as trivial, yet most people rule their lives with five or six of them. This collection contains five or six hundred, some of which you wouldn’t want to rule your life with.

  • Flirting with Mermaids

    Over the course of twenty years of delivering sailboats to far-flung quaysides, John Kretschmer has had innumerable adventures, both humorous and terrifying. in Flirting with Mermaids, he recounts the most memorable of them. He crosses the Western Caribbean with a crew of eccentric Swedes researching ancient Mayan mariners, lands in Aden at the outbreak of civil war, and endures a North Atlantic crossing during which he disocvers the existence of Force 13 winds. Approaching Japan at the end of a particularly trying delivery, he finds himself sailing in “a high impact debris zone,” but his resolve is unshaken. “If a piece of rocketship jetsam fell out of the sky and sank [me] after encounters with Hurricane Floyd, General Noriega, a tsunami, an erupting volcano, and Typhoon Roy, then it was meant to be.”

  • Here Lies My Heart

    This book is for the once, never, and much married. For believers and skeptics, love’s fools and love’s thieves. It is for people with long memories and long histories and for people who reinvent themselves in every new town, new decade, new relationship. This book is for everyone whose heart lies where it should, where it shouldn’t, and, in the end, where it must. -Amy Bloom, from the Foreword,In these intensely personal essays, contemporary writers probe their experiences in and thoughts about one of our most enduring social and cultural institutions. Husbands and wives celebrate marriages that work, mourn those that don’t, and write frankly about adultery. Includes essays by Mark Doty, Gerald Early, Barbara Ehrenreich, Cynthia Heimel, Vivian Gornick, Phillip Lopate, Nancy Mairs, and David Mamet.

  • Humans Need Not Apply

    An insightful, engaging tour by a noted Silicon Valley insider of how accelerating developments in Artificial Intelligence will transform the way we live and work.,Selected as one of the 10 best science and technology books of 2015 by The Economist.,After billions of dollars and fifty years of effort, researchers are finally cracking the code on artificial intelligence. As society stands on the cusp of unprecedented change, Jerry Kaplan unpacks the latest advances in robotics, machine learning, and perception powering systems that rival or exceed human capabilities. Driverless cars, robotic helpers, and intelligent agents that promote our interests have the potential to usher in a new age of affluence and leisure ??? but as Kaplan warns, the transition may be protracted and brutal unless we address the two great scourges of the modern developed world: volatile labor markets and income inequality. He proposes innovative, free-market adjustments to our economic system and social policies to avoid an extended period of social turmoil. His timely and accessible analysis of the promise and perils of artificial intelligence is a must-read for business leaders and policy makers on both sides of the aisle.

  • Losing the Nobel Prize

    What would it have been like to be an eyewitness to the Big Bang? In 2014, astronomers wielding BICEP2, the most powerful cosmology telescope ever made, thought they???d glimpsed the spark that ignited the Big Bang. Millions around the world tuned in to the announcement, and Nobel whispers began to spread. But had these cosmologists truly read the cosmic prologue or, driven by ambition in pursuit of Nobel gold, had they been deceived by a galactic mirage?,In ,, cosmologist Brian Keating???who first conceived of the BICEP (Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization) experiments???tells the inside story of BICEP2???s detection and the ensuing scientific drama. Along the way, Keating provocatively argues that the Nobel Prize actually hampers scientific progress by encouraging speed and competition while punishing inclusivity, collaboration, and bold innovation. To build on BICEP2???s efforts to reveal the cosmos??? ultimate secrets???indeed, to advance science itself???the Nobel Prize must be radically reformed.

  • Man’s Search for Meaning

    Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl’s memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl’s theory-known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos (“meaning”)-holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.,At the time of Frankl’s death in 1997, Man’s Search for Meaning had sold more than 10 million copies in twenty-four languages. A 1991 reader survey for the Library of Congress that asked readers to name a “book that made a difference in your life” found Man’s Search for Meaning among the ten most influential books in America.,Beacon Press, the original English-language publisher of Man’s Search for Meaning, is issuing this new paperback edition with a new Foreword, biographical Afterword, and classroom materials to reach new generations of readers.

  • Nutshell

    is a classic story of murder and deceit, told by a narrator with a perspective and voice unlike any in recent literature. A bravura performance, it is the finest recent work from a true master.,To be bound in a nutshell, see the world in two inches of ivory, in a grain of sand. Why not, when all of literature, all of art, of human endeavour, is just a speck in the universe of possible things.

  • Straw Dogs

    ‘Straw Dogs’ is a radical work of philosophy that challenges our most cherished assumptions about what it means to be human. John Gray explores how the world and human life look once humanism has been finally abandoned.

  • The Culture of Narcissism

    When , was first published in 1979, Christopher Lasch was hailed as a ???biblical prophet??? (,). Lasch???s identification of narcissism as not only an individual ailment but also a burgeoning social epidemic was groundbreaking. His diagnosis of American culture is even more relevant today, predicting the limitless expansion of the anxious and grasping narcissistic self into every part of American life., offers an astute and urgent analysis of what we need to know in these troubled times.

  • The Gutenberg Revolution

    In 1450, all western Europe’s books were handcopied and amounted to no more than a single modern library. By 1500 they were printed and numbered in their millions. Printing made possible the development of modern science and literature, and the political shift from statelets to nations. It brought about the biggest changes in human culture since the invention of the alphabet itself.,The man responsible was Johann Gutenberg, born in 1400 in Mainz, Germany. John Man explains how this technical genius, whose research into printing was funded by wealthy sponsors, struggled against a background of plague, religious upheaval and legal battles to bring his remarkable invention to light. Once the secret of printing got out, the world would never be the same again.

  • The News

    The news is everywhere. We can???t stop constantly checking it on our computer screens, but what is this doing to our minds?,We are never really taught how to make sense of the torrent of news we face every day, writes Alain de Botton (author of the best-selling ,), but this has a huge impact on our sense of what matters and of how we should lead our lives. In his dazzling new book, de Botton takes twenty-five archetypal news stories???including an airplane crash, a murder, a celebrity interview and a political scandal???and submits them to unusually intense analysis with a view to helping us navigate our news-soaked age. He raises such questions as Why are disaster stories often so uplifting? What makes the love lives of celebrities so interesting? Why do we enjoy watching politicians being brought down? Why are upheavals in far-off lands often so boring?,In ,, de Botton has written the ultimate guide for our frenzied era, certain to bring calm, understanding and a measure of sanity to our daily (perhaps even hourly) interactions with the news machine.

  • The Once and Future Liberal

    From one of the country???s most admired political thinkers, an urgent wake-up call to American liberals to turn from the divisive politics of identity and develop a vision of our future that can persuade all citizens that they share a common destiny.,In The Once and Future Liberal, Mark Lilla offers an impassioned, tough-minded, and stinging look at the failure of American liberalism over the past two generations. Although there have been Democrats in the White House, and some notable policy achievements, for nearly 40 years the vision that Ronald Reagan offered???small government, lower taxes, and self-reliant individualism???has remained the country???s dominant political ideology. And the Democratic Party has offered no convincing competing vision in response.,Instead, as Lilla argues, American liberalism fell under the spell of identity politics, with disastrous consequences. Driven originally by a sincere desire to protect the most vulnerable Americans, the left has now unwittingly balkanized the electorate, encouraged self-absorption rather than solidarity, and invested its energies in social movements rather than in party politics. ,With dire consequences. Lilla goes on to show how the left???s identity-focused individualism insidiously conspired with the amoral economic individualism of the Reaganite right to shape an electorate with little sense of a shared future and near-contempt for the idea of the common good. In the contest for the American imagination, liberals have abdicated.,Now they have an opportunity to reset. The left is motivated, and the Republican Party, led by an unpredictable demagogue, is in ideological disarray. To seize this opportunity, Lilla insists, liberals must concentrate their efforts on recapturing our institutions by winning elections. The time for hectoring is over. It is time to reach out and start persuading people from every walk of life and in every region of the country that liberals will stand up for them. We must appeal to ??? but also help to rebuild ??? ??a sense of common feeling among Americans, and a sense of duty to each other.,A fiercely-argued, no-nonsense book, enlivened by Lilla???s acerbic wit and erudition, The Once and Future Liberal is essential reading for our momentous times.

  • The Retreat of Western Liberalism

    In his widely acclaimed book ,, , chief US columnist and commentator Edward Luce charted the course of America’s relative decline, proving to be a prescient voice on our current social and political turmoil.,In ,, Luce makes a larger statement about the weakening of western hegemony and the crisis of liberal democracy–of which Donald Trump and his European counterparts are not the cause, but a terrifying symptom. Luce argues that we are on a menacing trajectory brought about by ignorance of what it took to build the West, arrogance towards society’s economic losers, and complacency about our system’s durability–attitudes that have been emerging since the fall of the Berlin Wall. We cannot move forward without a clear diagnosis of what has gone wrong. Unless the West can rekindle an economy that produces gains for the majority of its people, its political liberties may be doomed. The West’s faith in history teaches us to take democracy for granted. Reality tells us something troublingly different.,Combining on-the-ground reporting with intelligent synthesis of the literature and economic analysis, Luce offers a detailed projection of the consequences of the Trump administration, the rise of European populism, and a forward-thinking analysis of what those who believe in enlightenment values must do to defend them from the multiple onslaughts they face in the coming years.

  • The Second Machine Age

    A New York Times Bestseller.,A revolution is under way.,In recent years, Google???s autonomous cars have logged thousands of miles on American highways and IBM???s Watson trounced the best human Jeopardy! players. Digital technologies???with hardware, software, and networks at their core???will in the near future diagnose diseases more accurately than doctors can, apply enormous data sets to transform retailing, and accomplish many tasks once considered uniquely human.,In The Second Machine Age MIT???s Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee???two thinkers at the forefront of their field???reveal the forces driving the reinvention of our lives and our economy. As the full impact of digital technologies is felt, we will realize immense bounty in the form of dazzling personal technology, advanced infrastructure, and near-boundless access to the cultural items that enrich our lives.,Amid this bounty will also be wrenching change. Professions of all kinds???from lawyers to truck drivers???will be forever upended. Companies will be forced to transform or die. Recent economic indicators reflect this shift: fewer people are working, and wages are falling even as productivity and profits soar.,Drawing on years of research and up-to-the-minute trends, Brynjolfsson and McAfee identify the best strategies for survival and offer a new path to prosperity. These include revamping education so that it prepares people for the next economy instead of the last one, designing new collaborations that pair brute processing power with human ingenuity, and embracing policies that make sense in a radically transformed landscape.,A fundamentally optimistic book, The Second Machine Age will alter how we think about issues of technological, societal, and economic progress.

  • The Strange Death of Europe

    The Strange Death of Europe is the internationally bestselling account of a continent and a culture caught in the act of suicide, now updated with new material taking in developments since it was first published to huge acclaim. These include rapid changes in the dynamics of global politics, world leadership and terror attacks across Europe.,Douglas Murray travels across Europe to examine first-hand how mass immigration, cultivated self-distrust and delusion have contributed to a continent in the grips of its own demise. From the shores of Lampedusa to migrant camps in Greece, from Cologne to London, he looks critically at the factors that have come together to make Europeans unable to argue for themselves and incapable of resisting their alteration as a society. Murray’s “tremendous and shattering” book (The Times) addresses the disappointing failures of multiculturalism, Angela Merkel’s U-turn on migration, the lack of repatriation and the Western fixation on guilt, uncovering the malaise at the very heart of the European culture. His conclusion is bleak, but the predictions not irrevocable. As Murray argues, this may be our last chance to change the outcome, before it’s too late.